Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user 'indiamee'@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/indiamee/public_html/e-music/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Pop and rock


Sleaford Mods review – a bracing stream of class consciousness

Delivered... Kitty Empire | Scene | Sat 19 Sep 2020 2:00 pm

The Nottingham punk duo let rip with a livestreamed battery of barbed lyrics, bizarre noises and back-to-basics beats

Across town at the Royal Albert Hall, the Last Night of the Proms is under way. In the basement of London’s 100 Club – a famous venue in the annals of punk, granted “special status” by Westminster council before Covid struck – a man from Nottinghamshire is, not for the first time, at the end of his tether.

“Fuck England! Fuck my country!” he bellows to an empty venue, “Lob it in the bin!” Singer Jason Williamson doesn’t recognise his homeland any more. BHS has gone down. The “rich list” grows ever bigger. “In the snakes and ladders,” people like him, he snarls, “are the Baldricks, son, and Blackadders.”

Williamson says out loud the things people would like to say but would get sacked for if they did

Continue reading...

AG Cook: the nutty producer behind the decade’s most divisive music

Delivered... Rachel Aroesti | Scene | Wed 16 Sep 2020 9:00 am

Having polarised pop with the abrasive PC Music, he’s now going solo. ‘I trust my own dislike of things’, he says

Describing AG Cook’s haircut is a challenge. Part mullet, part moptop, it also features elements of shag, perm and bowl. The more I try to place it the context of hair history (Paul McCartney? Joan Jett? Late-80s Deirdre Barlow?) the more disorientated I become. It is not the only thing about him that is liable to confound. Cook, 30, from London, is the man behind PC Music, the record label whose sickly, abrasive and ultra-synthetic output doubled as the most divisive sound of the decade.

Yet, in typically contrarian style, the lead single for Cook’s new solo album, Apple, sounds completely different. Oh Yeah is a catchy guitar ballad pumped full of brain-tickling nostalgia for late-90s pop-rock. Much like his hairstyle, it evades all my attempts to find any close relatives (Natalie Imbruglia? Deep Blue Something? Hanson?). According to Cook, his main influence was actually Shania Twain.

Related: The Guide: Staying In – sign up for our home entertainment tips

Continue reading...

One to watch: Moonchild Sanelly

Delivered... Kate Hutchinson | Scene | Sat 12 Sep 2020 2:00 pm

The South African star, a favourite of Beyoncé, blends the Durban sound of gqom with horny global beats

If you felt the giddy thrill of Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion’s explicit hit WAP this summer then Moonchild Sanelly is bringing more of the same. With her trademark electric blue braids, Sanelly is one of South Africa’s most striking artists, and is unapologetic about female desire in her music. One new track, Where De Dee Kat, ends with sweet voices chorusing “penis penis penis”.

Sanelly is best known for rapping over a style of club beats called gqom, an apocalyptic, minimal electronic sound that came out of Durban townships and blends kwaito, house and techno. She moved there in 2005 to study fashion and immersed herself in the poetry and music scene, then relocated to Johannesburg, where she brings elements of punk, pop and hip-hop into her sound. She’s attracted the attention of Beyoncé, who put Sanelly on her The Lion King: The Gift soundtrack last year. The song, My Power, appeared again in her recent short film Black Is King. According to Damon Albarn, who worked with Sanelly on his Africa Express project, she is “a global superstar waiting to happen”.

Moonchild Sanelly’s Nüdes EP is out now on Transgressive Records

Continue reading...

Sophie Ellis-Bextor and Spiller: how we made Groovejet (If This Ain’t Love)

Delivered... Interviews by Elizabeth Aubrey | Scene | Tue 8 Sep 2020 6:00 am

The dance classic was the first song ever to be played on an iPod. But, as its creators reveal, the demo was left in a car – then tossed on to a floor and forgotten

This was one of the fastest tracks I ever produced. It was 1999, the night before I was due to fly to Miami for the Winter Music Conference, where all aspiring DJs and producers went. I was trying to stay awake for my early-morning flight and put on an unreleased version of Carol Williams’ Love Is You. I ended up sampling it and, in a couple of hours, I had Groovejet more or less written.

Related: Sophie Ellis-Bextor on music, motherhood and lockdown discos: ‘Most of my children are feral!’

Continue reading...

Sophie Ellis-Bextor and Spiller: how we made Groovejet (If This Ain’t Love)

Delivered... Interviews by Elizabeth Aubrey | Scene | Tue 8 Sep 2020 6:00 am

The dance classic was the first song ever to be played on an iPod. But, as its creators reveal, the demo was left in a car – then tossed on to a floor and forgotten

This was one of the fastest tracks I ever produced. It was 1999, the night before I was due to fly to Miami for the Winter Music Conference, where all aspiring DJs and producers went. I was trying to stay awake for my early-morning flight and put on an unreleased version of Carol Williams’ Love Is You. I ended up sampling it and, in a couple of hours, I had Groovejet more or less written.

Related: Sophie Ellis-Bextor on music, motherhood and lockdown discos: ‘Most of my children are feral!’

Continue reading...

Charles & Eddie’s Eddie Chacon: ‘It took me 10 years to recover from being a one-hit wonder’

Delivered... Andrew Male | Scene | Tue 1 Sep 2020 11:32 am

The soulful singer had a worldwide hit with 1992’s Would I Lie to You, but he was dropped and his musical partner died. Now, he has poured his pain into a cathartic comeback album

Eddie Chacon still remembers hitting rock bottom. “It was 15 years ago,” he says. “And it sounds like something from like a bad movie.” Since childhood, he would get up at 8am and work on music. “That morning, my wife walked into my studio and I was just sitting there. She asked, ‘What’s wrong?’ I just said, ‘Nobody’s listening.’ I turned everything off, walked out, and I never went back for 10 years.”

It’s a warm summer’s morning in Los Feliz, Los Angeles and Chacon is sitting in the bright, white study of his 1930s Spanish-style casita and talking about his new album, Pleasure, Joy and Happiness. If you know Chacon’s name it’s most likely as one half of early 90s US duo Charles & Eddie, who were No 1 for two weeks in 1992 with the sweet neo-soul pleader Would I Lie to You. Eddie was the androgynously handsome Latino one with the hoop earrings and the mane of thick, dark black hair halfway down his back. He sang the Marvin-meets-Jacko falsetto parts and those little cries of “Oh yeah!”

I always said if I got my head screwed on straight I could make one record where I was honest with myself

Continue reading...

Kelly Lee Owens: Inner Song review – a DJ finds her voice

Delivered... Kitty Empire | Scene | Sun 30 Aug 2020 3:00 pm

(Smalltown Supersound)
The Welsh musician-producer unleashes her own vocals while digging deeper with brooding electronics

Delayed to show “solidarity” with record shops threatened by Covid, Kelly Lee Owens’s second album finds the banging techno DJ venturing further into the realm of electronic pop. The digitals are still on point. Arpeggi’s creepy retro-futurism recalls Boards of Canada and earlier electronic experiments in Germany in the 1970s.

But when Owens was on tour with Four Tet, Kieran Hebden urged her to stop hiding her singing voice under a bushel. Now some actual songs – such as the resolute, sad banger On, or L.I.N.E. (Love Is Not Enough) – find the Welsh musician in full coo. The sweetness is deceptive: L.I.N.E. weighs up the compromises people make in relationships; solitude, she concludes, beats warping your essence.

Related: Kelly Lee Owens: ‘My patients were my career advisers’

Continue reading...

Disclosure: Energy review | Alexis Petridis’s album of the week

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Thu 27 Aug 2020 12:00 pm

(Island Records)
With nightclubs closed during coronavirus, the third album from the British pop-house duo has an unwittingly mournful quality

Occasionally, songs take on qualities that their authors never intended them to have. The passage of time casts different light on them; political groups and protest movements co-opt them, lending unanticipated meaning to the words; artists unexpectedly die and their final work becomes freighted with poignancy. To a roll-call that includes Martha and the Vandellas’ Dancing in the Street, John Lennon’s (Just Like) Starting Over, Bob Dylan’s Maggie’s Farm and McFadden & Whitehead’s Ain’t No Stopping Us Now, we now might add, a little unexpectedly, the third album by Surrey-born pop-house duo Disclosure, which events overtook before it was even released.

There may have been less opportune moments in history to put out an album filled with songs hymning the pleasures of clubs, of dancing en masse and of fleeting eyes-meeting-across-the-dancefloor romance, but you struggle to think of one. Energy arrives in a world where most venues are shuttered and festivals cancelled, where dancing with others carries with it the potential of contracting a fatal illness, where illegal raves have become a bigger public bugbear than in the Criminal Justice Act-provoking wake of Castlemorton, and where the dance scene has recently been convulsed by an argument about whether DJs should DJ at all. Online footage of big name DJs playing in continental Europe this month was greeted with general horror, the legal but maskless, non-socially-distanced “plague raves” they were performing at held by some to have contributed to a rise in Covid-19 infections.

Continue reading...

Disclosure: Energy review | Alexis Petridis’s album of the week

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Thu 27 Aug 2020 12:00 pm

(Island Records)
With nightclubs closed during coronavirus, the third album from the British pop-house duo has an unwittingly mournful quality

Occasionally, songs take on qualities that their authors never intended them to have. The passage of time casts different light on them; political groups and protest movements co-opt them, lending unanticipated meaning to the words; artists unexpectedly die and their final work becomes freighted with poignancy. To a roll-call that includes Martha and the Vandellas’ Dancing in the Street, John Lennon’s (Just Like) Starting Over, Bob Dylan’s Maggie’s Farm and McFadden & Whitehead’s Ain’t No Stopping Us Now, we now might add, a little unexpectedly, the third album by Surrey-born pop-house duo Disclosure, which events overtook before it was even released.

There may have been less opportune moments in history to put out an album filled with songs hymning the pleasures of clubs, of dancing en masse and of fleeting eyes-meeting-across-the-dancefloor romance, but you struggle to think of one. Energy arrives in a world where most venues are shuttered and festivals cancelled, where dancing with others carries with it the potential of contracting a fatal illness, where illegal raves have become a bigger public bugbear than in the Criminal Justice Act-provoking wake of Castlemorton, and where the dance scene has recently been convulsed by an argument about whether DJs should DJ at all. Online footage of big name DJs playing in continental Europe this month was greeted with general horror, the legal but maskless, non-socially-distanced “plague raves” they were performing at held by some to have contributed to a rise in Covid-19 infections.

Continue reading...

The Beloved: how we made The Sun Rising

Delivered... Interviews by Dave Simpson | Scene | Mon 24 Aug 2020 2:11 pm

‘The song blew up at the end of summer 1989, by which time a whole generation were going to outdoor raves. What other record are you going to play at 5.30am?’

Jon Marsh and I had been in an earlier, guitar-based version of the Beloved. We did two sessions for John Peel’s radio show, but then we slimmed to a duo and started making electronic music. It was the late 80s and house was just emerging. Jon had discovered an acid house club in London called Shoom and took me along. He said: “Come in here, take one of these and I’ll see you in the morning.” There was so much dry ice I couldn’t see my hand in front of my face. I just danced all night. After that, we’d go to these clubs, then come home and re-create that emotional rush in our own music.

Continue reading...

One to watch: Otta

Delivered... Jude Rogers | Scene | Sat 8 Aug 2020 2:00 pm

The Finnish-British musician’s compelling electronic pop recalls early Björk, the Radiophonic Workshop and more…

Otta is a Finnish-British singer-songwriter from south London whose electronic pop songs are bright, sharp and strange. On her new EP, Songbook, they have a compelling DIY fidgetiness about them – hardly surprisingly, given that she records much of her material in her home studio: “a cupboard-under-the-stairs-meets-shed”, she explains, “but still a precious altar”.

Moving to the UK when she was five, Otta first dreamt of being a professional drummer, starting lessons at seven. In her teens, acoustic guitars and Kanye West’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy inspired her to write songs (she’d do this in her bathroom), and at 16 she won a place at the Brit School, which introduced her to jazz and electronic production. These elements inform her sound now, as do additional details from producer Kwes (Solange, Loyle Corner, Nubya Garcia), who discovered Otta on SoundCloud and signed her to his own label, Bokkle.

Continue reading...

One to watch: Otta

Delivered... Jude Rogers | Scene | Sat 8 Aug 2020 2:00 pm

The Finnish-British musician’s compelling electronic pop recalls early Björk, the Radiophonic Workshop and more…

Otta is a Finnish-British singer-songwriter from south London whose electronic pop songs are bright, sharp and strange. On her new EP, Songbook, they have a compelling DIY fidgetiness about them – hardly surprisingly, given that she records much of her material in her home studio: “a cupboard-under-the-stairs-meets-shed”, she explains, “but still a precious altar”.

Moving to the UK when she was five, Otta first dreamt of being a professional drummer, starting lessons at seven. In her teens, acoustic guitars and Kanye West’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy inspired her to write songs (she’d do this in her bathroom), and at 16 she won a place at the Brit School, which introduced her to jazz and electronic production. These elements inform her sound now, as do additional details from producer Kwes (Solange, Loyle Corner, Nubya Garcia), who discovered Otta on SoundCloud and signed her to his own label, Bokkle.

Continue reading...

‘She gold-plated songs’: Denise Johnson, the voice of Manchester’s dancefloors

Delivered... Fergal Kinney | Scene | Tue 28 Jul 2020 2:10 pm

Nineties bands in need of rave vocals looked to the late Johnson, whose rich, fiery voice alchemised their music into something else entirely

News: Denise Johnson dies aged 56

Manchester’s nostalgia industrial complex tends to privilege its white men: Joy Division and Tony Wilson are the ones to have had biopics made about them, with another about Shaun Ryder on the way. But these rightful remembrances can crowd out figures such as Barry Adamson and Rowetta: black, genre-fluid pioneers amid the city’s wildly exciting music scene in the 1980s and early 90s. Vocalist Denise Johnson, who died this week aged 56, was another of them at the vanguard.

“Even though she was a mate,” remembers Johnny Marr, “you felt it was a privilege her being on your song. She kind of gold-plated songs – you knew that the track was going to acquire a few extra gold stars.”

Continue reading...

Jon Hassell, music’s great globetrotter: ‘Be more aware of the rest of the world!’

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Tue 28 Jul 2020 10:30 am

The 83-year-old is heralded by everyone from Bono to Basquiat for his ‘fourth world’ vision for music – and pop has caught up with him

Crackling down a phone line from Los Angeles, Jon Hassell apologises in advance. Now 83, the multi-instrumentalist and composer – a hero of Brian Eno, Björk, Bono, Jean-Michel Basquiat and others – fell in his recording studio earlier this year, breaking his leg. The subsequent recuperation in a convalescent hospital went on for four months. He had no visitors, due to the coronavirus pandemic, “so I only had my cell phone to maintain contact with the outside world”.

It is an experience that has had after-effects. “I’m feeling a little bird-out-of-cage-like,” he says. “I’ve just got a new apartment and I’m sitting here looking at all the things I’ve brought out of storage yesterday. The place is full of stuff and I have to dig through a lot of things now. And that kind of includes my memory,” he adds, referring to our conversation. “You might hear me searching for really polished answers. But let’s give it a try.”

Continue reading...

Jessy Lanza: All the Time review – witching-hour jams

Delivered... Emily Mackay | Scene | Sun 26 Jul 2020 9:00 am

(Hyperdub)
The Canadian producer takes a wicked turn in her deliciously offbeat third album

Should you ever find yourself pondering what sort of music ghosts play in the wine bars of the underworld, fret not, for Canadian producer Jessy Lanza has been answering your question since 2013. Her first two albums, Pull My Hair Back and 2016’s Oh No, perfected a witching-hours R&B haunted by a rich range of past styles, otherworldly alt-R&B rubbing up against lean club music and Lanza’s playful, gossamer falsetto in spare but compulsive spectral slow jams.

Her third album stays close to the formula, though with a slightly darker, starker turn: opener Anyone Around brings together a tight, crisp beat with dubby reverb, hazy, squidgy vintage keys and the sort of cheesy come-on line Lanza does so well: “I never behave when I’m around so close to you.” Face has the nervy tempo of footwork or garage, its seesawing vocal refrain giving it an unnerving bite, while Badly nails a uncanny pirate radio 4am feel, its slinky spareness blossoming into something deliciously just a little off-kilter. None of this is particularly radical in a post-everything musical landscape, but Lanza and her production and writing partner, Jeremy Greenspan of the underrated Junior Boys, do it particularly well, bringing a little of the afterlife’s rewards to the everyday.

Continue reading...
Next Page »
TunePlus Wordpress Theme