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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Software


macOS Catalina will be incompatible with much of your music software; here’s what to know

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 11 Sep 2019 11:36 am

macOS Catalina, the next Mac release, dramatically tightens security and removes 32-bit compatibility. That will cause incompatibilities with music software, requiring updates. Here’s what you need to know.

Catalina compatibility checklist

macOS Catalina (10.15) is expected to ship in October, replacing Mojave (10.14).

What’s impacted:

DAWs and other software using plug-ins: Requires updates to work.

Drivers: Installation and operation requires update to work.

32-bit software, software that accesses 32-bit libraries: Incompatible. Cannot be used past macOS Mojave.

Software using legacy video libraries: Incompatible. Cannot be used past macOS Mojave.

Plug-ins: May require update for full compatibility – but may run inside updated DAWs, and will install if the user overrides OS’ installer requirements.

Hardware: If a driver is required for operation, you’ll need an updated driver and installer. Driverless (class-compliant) audio and MIDI gear is unaffected.

Tightened Mac security

It’s worth acknowledging that security concerns are justified, even for consumer operating systems. Malware tools targeting users may be designed to exploit your computer’s resources, steal data, and impersonate you or even steal your money. At best, they can at least make your system unstable.

It’s also not just “a Windows thing”; recent attacks have singled out the Mac, too. For instance, security researchers uncovered an insidious piece of code found in downloads from a piracy website called VST Crack, embedded in pirated versions of software including Ableton Live. The software would embed itself on your system and start mining cryptocurrency. These threats do not impact the legitimate copies of the same software, so yes, this is an added risk when you pirate software.

All OS vendors regularly patch security holes; the approach in macOS Catalina (10.15) is more proactive. Apple are making some changes to the way the OS itself notifies you of activity by software and asks for your approval, a bit more like you had seen previously in iOS or Android. They’re also implementing tougher defaults for installers. And since malware works by running additional code on top of other code or memory, Apple are adding protections against running that code.

The issue here is not that these changes are unwarranted or even entirely unexpected, but that they bring a lot of change at once that will require you to update software – especially music software – in order for it to work properly, or at all.

Let’s look at those two changes separately: one is the change for installers (called “notarization”), and the second is a new set of requirements for how software is granted access to vital information (the “hardened runtime”).

The two requirements are related, because Apple won’t approve installers unless they also comply with the hardened runtime standards. So let’s take a look at the hardened runtime and entitlement permissions first.

Entitlements and the hardened runtime

Let’s recall here how malware works: it runs additional code that you didn’t intend to run, then gives that code access to something vital on your system (like your data, or microphone). So obviously, what Apple is doing is attempting to prevent those two things.

The first thing you’ll notice on macOS Catalina is that the Mac starts asking you for permission a lot more often. So now, the first time you print a score from notation software or try to open a file dialog to browse the desktop, you’ll get a pop-up asking if you really want to do that. That’s a bit annoying, but it’ll only happen once, and then will remember your permissions. And the reason it’s there is, of course, malware might otherwise perform the same task without your consent. You’re already familiar with this behavior from phone apps on Android and iOS; this is effectively the same idea, now on your desktop computer.

With a common, monolithic app, providing these permissions (called “entitlements”) is fairly easy. But music software isn’t monolithic. Your DAW is running all sorts of libraries and plug-ins and so on. Unfortunately, the exploits Apple is targeting in malware – “code injection, dynamically linked library (DLL) hijacking, and process memory space tampering” – also look a lot like the behaviors your DAW performs normally. And your DAW also needs to handle entitlements for plug-ins. In addition to the DAW needing your permission to access certain folders, for example, it also needs to ask your permission if a sample instrument like KONTAKT wants to access files, as well.

Here’s the bit you’ll really need to care about – if you’re upgrade to macOS Catalina, you will need to be prepared to upgrade your DAW, too. Providing this compatibility is complicated, so it’s likely that most developers will be able to support only their latest release – meaning you may require a paid update to that first.

The good news is, theoretically this burden falls on the DAW, not individual plug-ins. (Plug-ins may still require an update, because of the removal of 32-bit code and other portions of the OS required for compatibility, and because of new installer requirements.) But you will need to update any software working with plug-ins, or you may find software won’t run properly or will fail to run altogether.

It’s also likely that even with updates, some software will not work properly immediately after Catalina’s launch. Developers are still learning how to use this new feature of the operating system, and Apple’s frequent OS updates mean they have little time to do so. Also, an additional side effect of the new security requirements is to break the ability of plug-in developers to debug their plug-ins in DAWs, meaning testing is – for now – more difficult. That may slow compatibility and testing.

If you plan to use an older version of a DAW, you’ll want to avoid updating past macOS Mojave (10.14). If you do intend to update – or to buy a new Apple machine once Catalina is pre-installed and required by default – you should plan to use the very latest version of your DAW, and double-check that Catalina is supported. And even with listed Catalina support, expect there could still be some wrinkles immediately after the OS ships.

Once those pieces are in place, though, you will be able to use DAWs and plug-ins as you always have – just with some more pop-ups the first time you do something like access the file system or connect audio hardware.

(One illustration of how entitlements requirements might surprise you – someone on Reddit noticed the Live “computer keyboard” setting, which passes QWERTY keys to MIDI notes, suddenly broke in the Catalina beta. That makes sense; it would require the entitlements provided by the coming Live 10 update. And obviously, malware would love to be able to take your computer keyboard input and route it somewhere else without asking.)

Installer requirements and drivers

The other change in macOS Catalina is to require installers to be “notarized” by default (whereas previously it was a non-mandatory option). This means developers will submit installers to Apple for verification, and that they fulfill certain requirements for how those installers are built. (These requirements largely have to do with how they link against the Mac SDK and following new guidelines like the hardened runtime.)

Here’s what you see now, on macOS Mojave. (See Apple’s support article on these safety restrictions.) Catalina introduces new requirements for the “identified developer” section – that is, how they require developers to build their installers and verify them with Apple. But as in the current macOS, you’ll be able to control what you run in a similar fashion, even with tougher defaults.

This is not the same as the App Store approval requirements on iOS (or similar stores from Google and Microsoft). Apple aren’t looking at the software itself, only verifying the installer is built according to their standards. The process takes something like an hour currently, not days or weeks as the stores can. And most importantly, Apple will allow users to override the installer requirement. As with Gatekeeper in current versions of macOS, you’ll get a dialog telling the installer or app was blocked, but you’ll still be able to choose to run something anyway. (Right-click, choose open, and you’ll be given option.)

Notarization is the “Apple checked it for malicious software” bit. It’s available in the current macOS, but in 10.15 it’s required by default. That is, Apple developers not only register their ID, but also submit the software for a check with Apple, too.

Apple developer documentation on the notarization feature:
Notarizing Your App Before Distribution

Unverified plug-ins may also continue to work inside DAWs – depending on the DAW you’re using. This means in theory, you’ll be able to install and attempt to use plug-ins, even if they haven’t been updated for Catalina. You would need to override plug-in notarization requirements for the installation from dmg (Disk Image) files, but once a file was installed, a DAW may be able to support it, theoretically. Your mileage may vary when it comes to actual use, however; the advantage of the installer requirement may be that it gives a clue that a developer has tested on Catalina.

PreSonus has just announced for their Studio One DAW that not only will you need to update Studio One itself, but many plug-ins will also need an update. In their case, plug-ins built before June 1, 2019 will still need to be signed (the earlier method of verification for Apple developers). Plug-ins built after that date will need to fulfill Catalina’s tougher requirements – notarization and the hardened runtime.

Drivers for hardware will hit a hard wall. Unverified drivers will not function on the new OS. This means if you have older hardware that doesn’t have updated drivers and installer, you won’t be able to use it. There’s no ability to override this requirement.

Here’s what happens if you try to use a plug-in in PreSonus Studio One if the developer has not fulfilled Apple’s security verification requirements for the software. You’ll need to acquire updates for all of your plug-ins, accordingly.

End of the road for 32-bit and legacy libraries

Just as significant as the security changes, Apple is ending support for 32-bit code starting with Catalina. This is a hard barrier – you won’t be able to use “bridge” tools for 32-bit plug-in compatibility, for instance. Any 32-bit app, library, or plug-in will simply refuse to run.

It may not be immediately obvious that software makes use of 32-bit code, either. A 64-bit application may still make use of a 32-bit library. For instance, Ableton tell CDM that they found their previous versions of Live would attempt to call a 32-bit library on startup. These apps may not fail gracefully; they may simply crash. This means even if you’re using a 64-bit and 64-bit plug-ins, you will want to verify compatibility with the vendor before upgrading.

If you have 32-bit plug-ins or older software you rely on, you will likely want to stay on macOS Mojave. Once you upgrade, this software will cease to work. This may also mean you want to retain an older Mac running Mojave or earlier, for backwards compatibility.

Apple has also ended long-deprecated libraries, including the older video library (called QTKit).

Case study: Ableton Live

Ableton provided CDM with access to their compatibility process. An update to Live 10 will support Catalina’s new requirements at launch. This involved a series of changes, which may be typical for DAW developers. In Ableton’s case, it meant the following updates:

·         Rebuilding the installer with notarization support and its requirements

·         Removing all 32-bit code and libraries (including one 32-bit library that will cause previous versions of Live to crash on launch)

·         Providing full compatibility with Max

·         Transitioning video code to the latest AVFoundation (from a now-unsupported version of QuickTime)

The move to AVFoundation is good news for anyone working with video – even if you use an older macOS version like Mojave. There’s improved video export performance and new codec options.

Ableton also say you should expect that these updates mean you can use Live with existing plug-ins under Catalina. Based on what plug-in developers tell me, though, you should still anticipate there may still be some issues to resolve with individual plug-ins if you upgarde, and DAW developers like Ableton may not be aware of all of these situations on internal testing alone.

Because of the number of changes to be made, Live 9 will not support Catalina. Conversely, as Apple deprecates older OSes, Live 10 won’t support some of the older versions of macOS. Here’s what will be compatible:

Live 9: macOS 10.7 – 10.13 officially supported; 10.14 unofficially supported

Live 10: macOS 10.11 – 10.15 supported (macOS 10.15 requires the Live 10.1.2 update for Catalina, minimum)

Ableton have also published a technical note. The headline is about Live 9, but it also includes useful resources for Live 10 users:

Live 9 is not compatible with macOS 10.15 Catalina

Compatibility with other software

Many developers CDM contacted were not yet ready to make an official statement on Catalina. Off the record, a significant number of developers reported problems.

Native Instruments published a blanket statement saying simply none of their products are compatible:

macOS 10.15 (Catalina) – Compatibility with Native Instruments Products

PreSonus has published a technical note explaining that you’ll need not only an update to their Studio One DAW, but also to most (or all) of your plug-ins, as illustrated above:

Studio One 4 on Mojave and Catalina – Notarization, Hardened Runtime, and how it affects 3rd-party plug-ins

Apple has not necessarily had full support for a new OS even for its own pro software; I’ve contacted Apple to ask if Logic Pro will support Catalina at launch but have not yet gotten a response. (There is a precedent of Apple’s own pro apps sometimes lagging their OS, before you make the assumption that they two will be in sync.)

How should you upgrade, and when?

Here’s a simple piece of advice: don’t update to Catalina immediately. As with any major OS change, music installers, drivers, and DAWs will benefit from more time and testing. Since musicians have complex and diverse setups, odds are you rely on something that won’t be immediately compatible, or that interactions between tools could create unexpected results.

If you do update, you should absolutely make a full backup so you can easily roll back. Time Machine backups can also provide some ability to remove OS updates.

You can also create an external installation of the OS on any drive that is formatted to macOS extended Journaled. It’s probably worth buying an inexpensive drive to test first, especially with an update this significant.

If you’re a developer and want to share your compatibility information, please get in touch.

https://www.apple.com/macos/catalina/

The post macOS Catalina will be incompatible with much of your music software; here’s what to know appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The Sega Genesis gets a bit-accurate, FM synth remake: chipsynth MD

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 4 Sep 2019 5:28 pm

The Sega Genesis, aka Mega Drive, was more than just a beloved game console. It was also a powerful FM synth – seriously. And now you get an accurate, powerful version as a plug-in, in chipsynth MD from Plogue.

If you’re a Sega fan, you know the sound of this instrument from the sunny, sparkling, high-energy game soundtracks of the era. So, for you, yes, there’s a bit-accurate emulation of the OPN2 YM2612 chip and SN76489-compatible square wave core (SPSG). There’s even a recreation of the crunchy lo-fi sample playback.

You get the authentic sounds of the Sega hardware, modeled with bit-for-bit accuracy – but a deep interface you’d expect from a modern plug-in. Or you know, just sit back and listen to some classic Sega game scores. (Also, you will have to account for some lost musical productivity when this makes you want to play Sega games again.)

If you want to hear those vintage soundtracks the way they were intended to be heard, there’s even a VGM player. For Sega game fans, this is your new iTunes.

Whoa – if none of that meant anything to you, think of it this way: this is a 6-part polyphonic recreation of the 4-voice FM synth with a stupid amount of sound controls and grungy retro sample playback as a separate feature.

Listen to the new sounds you can get out of it:

But it doesn’t sample the Sega. It’s a loving recreation from the folks at Plogue, who have gotten deep into this sort of hardware recreation.

Standalone, VST2 (Mac, Windows), VST3 (Mac, Windows), Mac AU, AAX, all 64-bit. NKS support, which means it’s all playable directly from Maschine and Kontrol S- Series keyboards.

https://plogue.com/products/chipsynth-md.html

It’s oddly entertaining just watching them work with their test rigs to make this happen:

And for a full tour, Cockoo takes the software for a test drive:

This is the second of the chipsynth line, following a recreation of the lo-fi Yamaha PortaSound line. Put the two together, and you have two unique takes on FM.

Top image:

“Happy 26th Birthday Sonic the Hedgehog!”by MKöpke is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

The post The Sega Genesis gets a bit-accurate, FM synth remake: chipsynth MD appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Where is NI headed? Some official and unofficial answers

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 4 Sep 2019 12:31 pm

Native Instruments has responded to our request for more clarity on recent layoffs and how this impacts their future plans. Other sources tell us there have been deep cuts into teams managing products, marketing, and design.

As I wrote late last night, NI has publicly stated they’ve cut 20% of their workforce. I should clarify that that number represents the layoffs executed just on Thursday of last week. Multiple sources have confirmed additional layoffs over the summer push the number closer to at least 150 rather than 100. This includes a leaked departure of the existing desktop TRAKTOR team in July, and additional product owners and designers, including the previous Director of Design.

This isn’t entirely a shock, though the scale and concentrated timing may be. It does seem cuts at NI were a long time coming. Native Instruments has a massive and complicated array of products, many of them now legacy products, and an over-complicated structure around them – both from a marketing and organizational standpoint. I think it’d be tough to find anyone to disagree with that, even in a week when people’s emotions are riled up by watching major layoffs.

And this isn’t just about the business – there’s a direct line to your experience using the products. If NI has too many products and a complicated organization that makes it hard for people to work together, that impacts users. It means it’s tough to execute new ideas and make the tools you use better.

It also stands to reason that even in any significant reorganization means staffing changes and cuts. The questions customers and partners might ask then is – why these cuts, why so deep, why now, and what’s the plan going forward?

The picture I’ve gotten from Native Instruments officially is convoluted. NI says they’re working on an integrated platform, but the cuts have hit UI, UX, design, and engineering, and late in the apparent timeline for whatever project that would be. We’re also now in year three of NI’s push to get us to think about services, but we’re not much closer to understanding what that’s supposed to mean than when we started. Here are some landmarks in that timeline:

March 2017: NI acquires Metapop, founded by former Beatport CEO Matthew Adell. Adell becomes Chief Digital Officer.

October 2017: EUR50 million in investment from a private equity firm focusing on digital services growth.

January 2018: NI reveals Sounds.com.

August 2018: Adell is out as Chief Digital Officer. (I believe this role also is eliminated at the same time.)

July-August 2019: Roughly 150 people, or 30% of the workforce, laid off. 20% are cut on August 29 in a single day.

The Thursday round of layoffs are part of a string of changes through 2019, many as high as Director level – including, to be fair, some hiring as well as firing. The main question I had is, beyond CEO / co-founder Daniel Haver and Chief Innovation Officer / President Mate Galic, who is running the new product effort, now that existing leadership of Traktor and Komplete are gone and the Chief Digital Officer is almost a distant memory.

That person appears to be Nicholas Goubert, who has this year gone from VP Digital Services to VP of Products to – as of this month – Chief Product Officer. Streamlining the organization under a single product leader instead of separating digital/services from the organization at least makes sense. It means NI is realigning themselves as a services-driven company.

The obvious parallel would be to a company like Adobe, although while Adobe offers extensive services, it has kept a bunch of complex product teams and silos. In fact, that parallel itself may be apt – Adobe’s complexity reflects the fragmented and specific needs of designers. Musicians are even more particular, which speaks to the difficulty of this process. (And… I’m not sure all of you are entirely in love with Adobe, either.)

The business of being NI is selling stuff to us music makers, though, so – what service? Do we want it?

Here are official answers from NI to CDM. They don’t give me a much more solid grasp of what they have in mind or how they intend to execute it. (And as you see in the timeline above, they’re effectively announcing the business structure in September 2019 that delivers the services they first talked about at the start of 2017.)

But they at least confirm that they’re not exiting hardware or the DJ market, contrary to rumors, and that the future services are intended to connect to products you use now. Note that saying “we’re committed to Komplete” doesn’t also mean something like Reaktor. Those silos actually appear to remain. I’d be optimistic about something like Reaktor, which powers tons of sounds and products. So I don’t think you should panic about any major products, based on what we’re seeing here.

CDM: If Native is building a new platform, why were resources cut?

NI: Our new organization aims to break down functional and brand silos that have developed over time through the continuous expansion of our portfolio. Given our broad spectrum of products and the overlap between roles, it means that certain areas of product development are affected more than others by the redundancies. In the past, we have simply been doing too much at the same time and this strategic change as well as internal remapping of talent will allow us to move forward in a more effective and collaborative way.

With the focus on a platform strategy, do users need to be concerned about support for and investment in existing products?

We are fully committed to our existing brands Komplete, Maschine and Traktor. The reason why we are focusing on a platform strategy is actually to improve the experience for all users of our products. We strongly believe that by improving accessibility and usability of our portfolio, we will be able to provide an enhanced and more cohesive experience, both for existing and new customers. Rather than releasing more and more products, we want to ensure that users are getting the most out of our current products through a connected and unified experience.

Will Native Instruments continue to release integrated hardware?

Creating deeply integrated experiences between hardware and software remains at the core of our vision. However, we want to deliver more value to users of our hardware by implementing new features in the software that will allow for a better overall experience of our ecosystem.

What about the future of Traktor?

We continue to be fully committed to our DJ platform Traktor and its passionate users. Also within the DJ domain, we are focusing on improving the software experience, building on the creative and modular legacy of Traktor for both desktop and mobile. Supporting this, we are also continuing to evaluate the right accompanying hardware products. In fact, Traktor users can expect a new hardware controller this year.

Okay, so the most we can come out of this is, Traktor hardware and products remain. The leaked firing of the Traktor desktop team suggests that future Traktor products will take a different form, and won’t be based on the legacy Traktor codebase (which is what powers Traktor 3).

Other than that, we mostly have to wait.

I wish the new teams at NI the best. Before the layoffs, I’d heard from the current Metapop team, wanting to show what they’re working on. And with SoundCloud failing to deliver innovation for creators, and Alihoopa dead (the Propellerhead-created online music making service, later spun off), there’s a vast space for someone to show a way of using social features for music making.

However, I can only echo the overwhelming buzz I’m hearing from the larger community. Large layoffs are unsettling, not only because of the people lost, but because of the presumed disruption to the organization. Some talent in music tech is very specific – and the departure of these 150+ NI employees over recent months has competitors eager to hire. (Behringer went as far as posting their headhunting call publicly; other companies – inside and outside this industry – are being a bit more discreet.)

For now, what Native Instruments are announcing is mainly layoffs, not products. Their main job now, to regain trust after a shaky end to this summer, would be to turn that begin to say how this relates to the people who rely on them.

I know a lot of you are deeply invested in this company – some even in your businesses as partners as well as in your music making careers or passions. I’ll do my best to keep you informed.

The post Where is NI headed? Some official and unofficial answers appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Native Instruments cuts 20% of workforce, moves to ‘platform’ strategy

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 4 Sep 2019 12:15 am

Native Instruments last week cut 20% of their workforce, as part of a “One Native” strategy that is leaving some customers and media uncertain about the direction of the company and its products.

Here in Germany, news of the layoffs spread quickly. On top of a handful of layoffs over the past couple of years, roughly 100 staff were cut in a single-day reorganization. Over the course of Thursday, those employees learned the news, most in the Berlin headquarters. With cuts this deep, news spread to social media, but in absence of a public statement, there was little to report.

Native Instruments delivered a statement to CDM on Monday, included unedited below.

It’s murky on details about products, however. I am in touch with NI about the reorganization, and requested more clarification from NI and its executive team. I haven’t yet received that information.

The summary, as we wait:

Revenues continued to grow for NI through 2019, so any snap analysis you may have read online that this is in response to financial trouble are likely misguided. NI says they made these cuts as part of a refocused emphasis on a “new, unified, and fully integrated platform” coming next year, and what it terms their “One Native” strategy.

So, NI has silos and divisions in their organizational chart that don’t fit their future product plans. This has happened in NI’s portfolio before, for those of us who have followed the company for many years.

The challenge is, the current cuts NI is making – across Sales & Distribution, Marketing & Product Management, Administration, and Engineering, according to the statement – reduce some of the talent inside the company. They have an ambitious plan, in other words, and now with fewer people remaining, all reorganized into new teams. I expect that will raise some questions among both customers and partners in their third-party ecosystem about their ability to deliver.

It’s also unclear what this platform will be. It’s not sounds.com, exactly – the press statement says it will “include” elements of that. It may also include technology or elements related to recent acquisition Metapop, a collaborative online space for sharing tracks and holding competitions. The statement says this online service will connect the company’s “existing ecosystem of … software and hardware” to some kind of “centralized online platform.” For those invested in current products, though, that doesn’t provide a lot of clarity – least of all when some of the people developing those products you use were just laid off.

To state the obvious, this has come as a blow to many in the tight-knit community around music production technology. These are partners and friends to basically anyone working closely with this industry. The tools in question are an intimate part of music making for many of you.

I will keep asking questions in the hope that we get a clearer picture of where Native Instruments, the organization, and NI’s product lines are headed in the future.

I’ll share answers as soon as I have them, as accurately as I can.

Here is NI’s initial statement:

Native Instruments centralizes organization and reduces global headcount to focus on platform strategy

Berlin, August 29, 2019 – Native Instruments, the world’s leading provider of software and hardware for computer-based music production, announced today a plan to centralize their global business operations, which includes a headcount reduction of 20% across all locations. The key reason for this difficult decision is to create the right organizational setup to focus on the development of a new, unified and fully integrated platform on which the company’s entire portfolio of products and services will be available next year. This change comes despite growing revenues in 2018 and the first half of 2019, but as a response to an increasing cost structure due to the company’s previous divisional setup and multi-brand approach.

“Today is a very emotional day for the Native community. We’ve been driving innovation in music creation since the 1990s. First through software instruments, then by expanding to an integrated ecosystem with complementing hardware and now by creating a unified platform experience for the modern music producer,” said Daniel Haver, the company’s CEO and co-founder. “To make this transformation successful, we needed to adapt our strategy, including a centralized functional setup that can support our vision of ‘One Native’. Unfortunately, this also means we had to make some tough decisions and part ways with a number of employees. This has been the hardest part of this transformation,“ he added.

Global headcount reduction of 20%

As a consequence of the company’s newly centralized organization to focus on its future strategy, Native Instruments had to make the difficult decision to reduce its workforce by around 100 employees across all sites. With most of the affected employees located at the company’s headquarters in Berlin, the departments that were impacted by the consolidation include Sales & Distribution, Marketing & Product Management, Administration and Engineering. All employees were informed about these changes on Thursday, August 29, 2019. The company regrets the impact this has on their employees, their families and the community. In addition to severance packages and outplacement services, Native Instruments has also established contacts with other Berlin-based companies that are currently looking for highly qualified personnel.

“This was the most difficult decision we had to make in our entire history, as our past successes have been enabled by the work of some of the best and most passionate people in the music industry. We thank all employees for their commitment, hard work, and their high degree of loyalty to Native Instruments. We are fully committed to doing all we can to take care of our employees impacted during this difficult time,” said Daniel Haver.

New platform starting in 2020

Recognizing changing customer behaviors worldwide, the aim of focusing on a unified platform strategy is to create an expandable commercial and technological basis for future growth in the digital music production area. For that, a new platform is currently being developed with the goal of offering new ways of accessing the company’s core products and services, as well as complementary ones from third-parties. The centralized platform will also include the company’s expanded portfolio of loops and samples, which is currently part of sounds.com, and will launch in 2020. The company’s previous divisional structure, functional and brand silos, did not allow for a successful implementation of this strategy up until this point.

“Customers today are expecting a seamlessly integrated experience when consuming and accessing creative goods and services. We are confident that we can offer music producers worldwide a unique and premium experience by connecting our existing ecosystem of award-winning software and hardware to a centralized online service,” said Mate Galic, Native Instruments’ Chief Innovation Officer and President. “In the past, we expanded in different product lines, which was also reflected in our organizational structure. Our platform vision, however, requires a much more collaborative approach, having all parts of the company work together towards one common goal.”

The post Native Instruments cuts 20% of workforce, moves to ‘platform’ strategy appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Gory sounds from vegetables and fruits: Mortal Kombat sound design

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 28 Aug 2019 6:21 pm

VICE News did a great video piece on the sound design of the latest Mortal Kombat video game. And it could inspire you to try some experiments with a mic yourself.

“You punched my brain out of my face.” Okay, that needs some gooey, awful sounds indeed.

VICE headed to the recording facilities at Netherrealm Studios in Chicago, who worked on the game’s foley track, and spoke with Senior Sound Designer Stephen Schappler. Now, you may or may not get the chance to make your own violent game soundtrack, but the thoughts here are some added sonic inspiration to try new experiments with a mic.

The secret sauce is pretty simple: actual blunt objects and weapons, meet … juicy fruits and veg. Get those organic sounds, then repitch, process, distort, and so on. (It occurs to me that may shift the approach a bit from the more real-for-real technique of someone like Ben Burtt, whose sounds for the likes of Star Wars seemed to involve more layering and unexpected recordings, lacking some of this software. But both directions likely now hold some appeal for us today.)

Nutcracker and nuts – that’s easy. Squishing a green pepper or grapefruit – fantastic. I won’t give all the rest away.

In the box, there are still more tricks – let’s trainspot a bit here.

The DAW is Reaper, which looks like Stephen has really mastered in keyboard shortcuts. (Note also the track folders for asset management.)

You’ll also see he keeps a second display for maintaining a giant list of sound files. And there are some convenient controllers handy (a MIDI Fighter Twister, PreSonus FaderPort – actually, the Classic.)

The big trick here is mangling the samples with Twisted Tools’ S-LAYER for Reaktor 5 and later.

Fun times.

You know you’re a sound geek, though, when this makes you want to open Reaktor rather than a PlayStation.

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Reverb are giving away their complete $841.58 drum machine sample collection, free

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 27 Aug 2019 1:15 pm

Maybe they’re feeling generous after getting bought by Etsy for $275 million. But whatever the reason, now you can have some 50 libraries of classic drum machine samples, for free, from Reverb.com.

Rare, popular, iconic, forgotten – it’s the full gamut, from Suzuki RPM-40 and Hammond Auto-Vari 64 to, you know, 909.

I would say this would hurt some other sample library providers, but frankly there’s a ton of stuff in there that I just have never seen sampled, so it’s more like – get ready for some tyranny of choice in your next drum kit assembly.

No idea how long this is going, so worth grabbing now:

https://reverb.com/software/samples-and-loops/reverb/3514-reverb-drum-machines-the-complete-collection

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Reason 11: tons of new devices, features, and now it’s a plug-in, too

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 26 Aug 2019 12:20 pm

Reason 11 unveils a bunch of new stuff – and the company that brought you ReWire is finally lets you use Reason as a plug-in. Oh, also – that company is no longer “Propellerhead.”

This is the most news from the Props in a single day for a while, at least in my recent memory. Let’s do the run-down.

Reason 11 is coming, with some changes to how it’s delivered:

  • Reason 11 is in beta now, coming September 25.
  • Reason will come with a plug-in covering just instruments, effects, and sounds, called Reason Rack (VST3 in September, AU later this year).
  • There’s now a Suite version, which adds 16 of their own Rack Extensions (including one new addition).
  • New pricing – Reason Intro (€79), Reason (€349) and Reason Suite (€549).

Buried in the fine print, Suite gets you – Scenic Hybrid Instrument [new], Complex-1 Modular Synth, Umpf Club Drums, Umpf Retro Beats, Reason Electric Bass, Reason Drum Kits, Processed Pianos, Layers Wave Edition, Layers, Parsec Spectral Synthesizer, Radical Keys, Polar Dual Pitch Shifter, Rotor Rotary Speaker, PolyStep Sequencer, Quad Note Generator, Drum Sequencer.

To me, having the Buchla-inspired Complex-1 modular, the step sequencer and quad note generator, Drum Sequencer, and Parsec are enough for me to recommend Suite to enthusiast producers. Those are already to me the main reason to fire up Reason these days.

Reason 11’s availability as a plug-in is the feature that will get everyone’s attention in the new release, but there are a lot of improvements to functionality.

New features and devices:

  • There are a bunch of new devices: Chorus Ensemble, Sweeper Modulation, Master Bus Compressor, Channel Dynamics, and Channel EQ (the last three emulating landmark analog gear – and adapted from the existing mixer, but now possible to use in Combinator patches and the new plug-in)
  • Curved automation and audio clip crossfades (finally is definitely called for here)
  • Improved vertical zoom
  • New MIDI editing features (mute, multiple notes, selection enhancements)
  • Scenic Hybrid Instrument is a “cinematic dream machine.” It feels a little bit like a Swedish take on Omnisphere, with a fresh Nordic UI but – will check it out soon.

So, to translate there – Reason 11 gives you the ability to use another DAW, but it also gives you a bunch of reasons not to do that. Finally having curves and automation, plus rounding out the dynamics processing options, should make doing your track inside Reason way more fun.

What’s new in Reason 11

And lastly…

Propellerhead is dead. Long live Reason Studios. There’s no actual corporate change here, but there is a name change: the company we know as Propellerhead will now be Reason Studios. Plus, there’s a new logo, which reminds me of time spent playing Q*bert. Here, let me demonstrate:

Fun fact: I do all my measurements in units of lowercase ‘n.’

@!*?@! is something you’ll hear me say sometimes while working.

What’s it all mean?

So, fast take on this – all of this was a long time coming. And it’s great news for loyal Reason users.

The plug-in idea is a long time coming. ReWire was a clever idea, and it introduced at least some producers to the idea of combining different tools. It let you use Reason as a rack of instruments and effects in a DAW – and originally at a time when Reason’s own arrangement and audio facilities were limited. But ReWire hasn’t really survived as a technology, as operating systems advanced and security changes even make it untenable. (As far as I know, ReWire won’t even be possible in the imminent next version of macOS.)

Meanwhile, a plug-in does what you really need, by letting you keep your favorite instrument/effect racks inside software like Ableton Live. FL Studio already does this, so it’s not even uncharted territory, and those FL users seem really happy with it.

This also means that Reason’s excellent console tools and West Coast modular instrument are available in your DAW, which is a big deal – just to name two examples, among many. (I can’t wait to use the Complex-1 everywhere.)

The demise of Propellerhead as a name is a little bittersweet for all of us. The name Propellerhead was quirky, unique … “Reason” we’ve gotten used to, even if there was already a “Logic.” But sure, the logo looks overly 1990s, and there was always this Web domain problem of the company Propellerhead being at Propellerheads.se (plural).

And Propel– uh, Reason Studios – really has just one product. After unsuccessful efforts in hardware (an audio interface that never took off), plus Web and services (that effort was spun off as Alihoopa, then shuttered this year), the company is focusing on the one tool that never fails. That’s Reason, plus the flourishing ecosystem of instruments and effects that sits on top of it. And people really stick with the name of the tool they use every day – Pro Tools, “Ableton” (since most people don’t call it “Ableton Live”), Cakewalk (not SONAR, not 12 Tone Systems – eep).

This has been an end of an era for the company in a lot of ways – CEO and co-founder Ernst Nathorst-Böös turned over the reins to Niklas Agevik in June.

Now, the one big disappointment to me is, it still sounds like Reason lacks a proper scalable interface. I expect that will be a major architectural change, since it also will impact Rack Extensions. But it’s needed, and I’ll try to find out more.

Otherwise, Reason 11 looks like another compelling release from a company that continues to inspire passion in its users.

Product manager Mattias Häggström Gerdt weighs in:

Announcing Reason 11 – a word from the Product Manager

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Max gets more eye candy: GL3 for Jitter in beta

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 23 Aug 2019 7:59 pm

Calling all GPU instrumentalists – Cycling ’74 is now significantly beefing up Jitter’s graphics engine with support for the latest 3D hardware, in GL3. The result: more eye-popping eye candy in Max.

To be fair, Max is a little behind some more graphics-focused rivals when it comes to latest-and-greatest GPU support. But Max and Jitter present a unique, familiar workflow and features that are in some sense beyond compare. GL3 moves Jitter a bit more in the direction of supporting cool, new features. In exchange, you’re going to need a newer graphics card – integrated-only machines are out, as is older hardware (GPUs from about five years ago or so). But my guess is, if you care about these features, you’re running a newer machine, anyway.

GL3 is the new graphics engine. It’s beta for now, but you can already have a proper play. And because this runs in Max, it also means the possibility of running a Max for Live setup with these graphics inside Ableton Live, which isn’t possible with other environments.

What’s new, to try out in this public beta:

Modern GLSL language support

GPU instancing with jit.gl.multiple and jit.gl.mesh

2D texture input directly to a jit.gl.cubemap face or 3D texture slice

Transform Feedback of vertex data via the new jit.gl.buffer and jit.gl.tf objects. This feature allows you to preserve vertex or geometry shader output for future use as geometry data on the graphics card, opening the door to some highly efficient particle simulations and new creative possibilities that we haven’t thought of yet.

Do you need to be an expert shader coder to take advantage of this stuff? Nope, and even those who are aren’t above a little copy-paste action with Shadertoy, a site with tons of dazzling demos of what clever GLSL code can put on the screen. (I showed how to do this in another stalwart creative development tool beloved by artists, Isadora – see link at bottom.)

It’s nice to see the bleeding-edge stuff “just work” right in Jitter with GL3. That’s some impressive work.

Let us know if you make anything with this (or the previous Jitter engine). Sign up for the public beta:

https://cycling74.com/forums/gl3-package-public-beta

Previously:

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Aaltoverb is a reverb you can play like an instrument (VST, AU)

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 23 Aug 2019 7:12 pm

Normally, when you touch reverb controls, you get weird clicks and ranges that make no sense… Aaltoverb is different. It’s a performance-friendly reverb effect, now as a Windows and Mac plug-in.

Madrona Labs are a boutique instrument builder in Seattle. How boutique? Well, their “about” page just has a nice picture of a tree. It’s basically three people – owner Randy Jones, plus Brian Willoughby (hardware guru) and Philip Kobernik (Web guru). But they’ve made some breakthrough creations. The Soundplane is a beautiful wooden controller that looks like it might be an exotic folk instrument, and helped establish MPE (MIDI Polyphonic Expression). And they’ve been innovators in modular software, including the Aalto modular plug-in, inspired by Buchla and West Coast synthesis methods.

As the name implies, Aaltoverb is a spinoff of Aalto – because some Aalto users were already so enamored by the reverb in the modular, they started using it on its own. But while Aalto means wrapping your head around another modular interface, pretty much anyone should be able to pick up Aalto and play around immediately.

And play around is exactly what you’ll be able to do, because Aaltoverb is a reverb you can play like an instrument.

Change the size parameter without hearing any clicks – for morphing reverb effects, or a ‘verb you can dial around onstage. (In place of clicks, you’ll get pitch shifting – closer to the sound of a tape delay than what you’d expect from most reverbs.)

There’s also an infinite decay time, which sits right at the top of the decay dial – so you can flick a controller and get a wash of sound, without requiring a more limited ‘freeze’ control.

And there’s the tone dial, too – a combination of low and high shelf EQs are overlapped so you get consistent sound shaping across the range without phase problems. Madrona Labs comprare it to the isolator on a DJ mixer.

All of this is US$35, with both the Mac and Windows license. (That suits me – Randy sent me one license, and I can use it on both my Mac and Windows laptops, which I tend to swap between sort … at random. Maybe that’s you, too.)

It’s 2019, so this is 64-bit AU and VST3 only. But for $35, no complaints. There’s also a nice manual.

Randy as always has done some wonderful trippy sounds as demos, which you’ll find on the product page:

https://madronalabs.com/products/aaltoverb

I’ve only just started playing with it, but I find it really elegant. I’m sure there are some other reverbs around that do this, but I can’t think of any with an interface this clear and musical.

http://madronalabs.com

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Grainstation-C is a free granular tool with ambisonics, and an album to match

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 29 Jul 2019 8:39 pm

It started as an artist tool, but it could become yours, as well. Grainstation-C is a free and open source sound creation workstation that’s playable live and supports ambisonic spatial sound. And the music its creators makes is ethereal and wonderful.

Micah Frank, noted sound designer and toolmaker as well as composer/musician, produced Grainstation-C for his own work but has expanded it to an open source offering for everybody. I’ve been waiting for this one for a while, and I think it could appeal both to people looking for a unique tool as well as those wanting to learn a bit more about granular sound in Csound.

https://github.com/chronopolis5k/Grainstation-C [link + full installation instructions, etc.]

http://csound.com/download.html [requisite Csound install]

The engine: 4 streams from disk, 3 streams from live input. Live audio looping, multiple grain controls, six independent pitch delay lines, six switchable low- and high-pass filters. Snapshot saving.

Powered by: Csound, the modern free and open source sound creation tool that evolved from the grandparent of all digital audio tools.

Live control: It’s pre-mapped to the eminently useful Novation LaunchControl XL MK2, but you could easily remap it to other MIDI controllers if you prefer.

Ambisonics: This optional spatial audio processing lets you use a standard format to adapt to immersive sound environments – in three-dee! Or not, as you like.

It’s deep stuff – even with different granular modes and controls (time stretching, frame animation, pitch shifting). The inspiration, says Micah, was the now-discontinued System Concrète, a complete MakeNoise modular rig that combined grains with modulation, filtering, and delays. But – as is easily possible with software, unconstrained by knobs and space and money – he kept going from there.

Equally notable is the ethereal, beautiful album Quetico that also debuts this week, on Micah’s own Puremagnetik record label. Once, the line between toolmakers and musicians, engineers and composers was thought sacred – even with elaborate explanations about why the two couldn’t be compared. But just as electronic artists have demolished other sacred walls (club and concert, for instance), Micah is part of a generation doing away with those old prejudices.

And the results are richly sensual – warm waves of sound processed from Yellowstone geysers and Big Sur nights, Micah says. It’s classic ambient music, and the tool simply melts away, the essential craft of delivering a palette of sound. At the same time, being transparent with the tools is the ultimate confidence in one’s own musical invention. Micah’s Puremagnetik was a business built in making sounds for others, and yet both the album and free tool suggest the limitless possibility of that act of sharing.

In any event, this is acousmatic creation of the finest quality, with or without the GitHub link. And Micah is getting some deserved recognition, too, with a 2019 New York Foundation award for the Arts Fellow in Music and Sound.

With so much of the sound out of my country of origin the United States ugly, it’s wonderful to hear beautiful algorithmic sounds derived from the nation’s national parks instead.

https://micahfrank.bandcamp.com/album/quetico

Image credit: “Yellowstone 8/07”by stevetulk is licensed under CC BY 2.0

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Signal adds the modulation Ableton is missing – and now does steps, crossfader

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 22 Jul 2019 5:12 pm

Signal from Isotonik was already a revelation – a powerful toolkit for adding modulation to Ableton Live. But curves, step sequences, and crossfades add real motion and transformation to your music.

Darren of Isotonik Studios has been busy documenting how to use this with some no-nonsense, clear video tutorials. It’s the latest episode, adding Steps and Crossfader module, that gets really exciting:

The new module Steps alone is reason to write home. It’s capable both of the titular step-sequenced, fixed steps, but curves, as well. And while you’ll find modulation built in in tools like FL Studio, Reason, and Bitwig Studio, the implementation via Max for Live by Isotonik has some really lovely usability that stands alone.

The Crossfader is unique, too – this isn’t just a mixer for audio signals, but modulation sources, as well.

Cross-fading LFO signals.

It’s worth checking the other videos, too. Episode two looked at the cult hit VST plug-in Serum, creating sound design with Signal in combination. And even with Massive X just out, this is some interesting stuff:

You’ll probably want to start at the beginning, which introduces Freeze and LFO (since I’m listing these in reverse chronological order):

You’ll notice the Chaos Culture moniker on there; this is their creation. You’ll probably want Live 10 Suite, but anything Live 9.7.5 or later, plus an active Max for Live 8.0.2 license, will work, across Mac and Windows.

It’s so deep, it suggests whole new workflows and compositional ideas, so I’ll be sure to start some music from scratch with this one. But it’s really quite well done, and a rich enough approach to modulation that developers on other environments may well want to have a look.

Signal is €88.05 – pricey for a Max for Live creation, but then possibly even bigger than any recent Live upgrade from Ableton themselves. If you have a go, let us know how it works; I’ll try to post some more impressions in August.

https://isotonikstudios.com/product/signal/

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Learn how to arrange your modular tracks with VCV Rack, Ableton Live

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 16 Jul 2019 1:53 pm

It’s one of the first challenges with any modular – you get a wild banging groove, but then… you’re stuck with it. One new video tutorial suggests a way to arrange your modular with Ableton Live and free VCV Rack software.

Live’s real-time arrangement and triggering features have always been part of its appeal – something exploited by everyone from live electronic musicians to those triggering sounds for radio and theater. Here, it’s a great way to take your cabled modular concoctions and actually turn them into a song structure or live performance. But it may not be immediately obvious to beginners how to go about it.

The inspiring VCV Rack ideas comes to the rescue here. It’s been updated for the just-release VCV Rack 1.0.

Now the audio advice here is actually soon to become outdated – Bridge will go away later this year, and you’ll be able to run Rack as a plug-in. But you can actually skip that part if you want to go another route, and just let Rack control your audio interface and send MIDI from Ableton Live.

(You could also apply this on Linux easily, with Bitwig Studio in place of Live – think I’ll try that myself, in fact.)

But the basic idea here is, run MIDI from Live to Rack, and use clips and scenes to trigger changes. There are some clever ideas about how to map control via CV and MIDI, and then the really important step is adding a physical controller, so you can get your hands on the live performance and improvise.

Note that while this example uses VCV Rack, you could apply the same ideas to any modular with MIDI input – or even mix in a partial or complete hardware set with the same rig. And watching this I also imagine some other ideas for where to go; this is by definition an open-ended process. Have a look:

Have you got another way of working? We’d love to hear about it in comments.

By the way, if you’re at SONAR this week, I’ll be giving a workshop with VCV Rack on Friday. (You need a delegate pass / pre-registration. But of course I’ll share some of how it goes here on CDM soon.)

https://sonarplusd.com/en/programs/barcelona-2019/areas/workshops/the-no-money-modular-synth-for-beginners-with-peter-kirn

Previously:

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Leakage is a freaky Ableton Live bass machine, Wavetable monster, from $0

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 10 Jul 2019 3:00 pm

It’s an automatic glitching bass. It’s a transformative set of 128 Wavetable sounds. It’s a Max for Live chaining device. It’s all of that – it’s Leakage, the free/pay-what-you-will Ableton Live creation from Tom Cosm.

The idea is to give you ever-changing bassline sounds each time you hit a note, for colorful and glitchy results. To pull that off, you get a number of features:

  • 128 custom Wavetable presets
  • Max for Live device that switches sounds
  • Preset switching, via chains – 128 chains, one for each sound
  • 8 parameters per sound: chain, filter amount, filter attack, filter decay, “grunt” (wavetable morphing), modulation amount, modulation rate, “special alpha” (per-sound parameter)
  • Set number of steps, up to 128, to determine rate of change
  • “Count MIDI” sets the step size to the number of notes in the active clip
  • Velocity-based switching

Watch:

An introduction to Leakage.

Tom says this is the culmination of five years of work, but he’s been waiting for Ableton Live 10.1 and the processing bandwidth of current machines to unleash this. You’ll need of course Live 10.1 with Wavetable and a Max for Live license (probably, but not limited to, Suite).

This is pay what you want, starting at $0 to download. If you do put in some money, you’ll be added to an early access list for promised future editions, with bassline, lead, and effect features.

It’s really encouraging to hear Tom talk about how well that’s worked:

“To be honest, it blew my mind how many of you made a contribution. People chipped in 1, 2 or 5 bucks… but a lot of you did! It was so much it covered my rent and bills for a month, freeing up my time so I could work on this Leakage release. I was totally blown away by the generosity, so I am going to keep rolling with this system. Even if it’s just 2 dollars, it all adds up and means I can keep pumping out new and exciting tools, without having to restrict the availability to people who have money.”

Check it out:

Leakage from Tom Cosm [Gumroad]

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How to patch 3D visuals in browser from Ableton Live, more with cables.gl

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 8 Jul 2019 6:02 pm

Now, even your browser can produce elaborate, production-grade eye candy using just some Ableton Live MIDI clock. The question of how to generate visuals to go with music starts to get more and more interesting answers.

And really, why not? In that moment of inspiration, how many of us see elaborate fantastic imagery as we listen to (or dream about) music. It’s just been that past generative solutions were based on limited rules, producing overly predictable results. (That’s the infamous “screensaver” complaint.) But quietly, even non-gaming machines have been adding powerful 3D visualization – and browsers now have access to hardware acceleration for a uniform interface.

cables.gl remains in invite-only beta, though if you go request one (assuming this article doesn’t overwhelm one), you can find your way in. And for now, it’s also totally free, making this a great way to play around. (Get famous, get paid, buy licenses for this stuff – done.)

MIDI clock can run straight into the browser, so you can sync visuals easily with Ableton Live. (Ableton Link is overkill for that application, given that visuals run at framerate.) That will work with other software, hardware, modular, whatever you have, too.

For a MIDI/DJ example, here’s a tutorial for TRAKTOR PRO. Obviously this can be adapted to other tools, as well. (Maybe some day Pioneer will even decide to put MIDI clock on the CDJ. One can dream.)

They’ve been doing some beautiful work in tutorials, too, including WeaveArray and ColorArray, since I last checked in.

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Explore the visual wonders of TouchDesigner: Summit, free workshop video

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 3 Jul 2019 6:13 pm

Few software tools have proved as expressive in generative visuals or audiovisual performance as TouchDesigner. Get introduced to its AV powers in a new, free video – or if you can make it Montreal, get the full experience live.

TouchDesigner is a dataflow tool – a graphical, patchable development environment – uniquely suited to squeezing gorgeous eye candy out of your computer graphics card. It’s also special for being musical and modular. It’s pretty enough that I’ve seen its actual zoomable UI displayed as art in performances, but whether or not you share that with the audience, it’s a kind of digital, graphical counterpart to the renewed love of cables and patching in sound.

Russian-born, Berlin-based Stanislav Glazov has gone deep into that world both as a teacher and as an artist. (You can catch his visuals this week as part of the UY ZONE, a fashion-meets-performance immersive environment inside Berghain in Berlin, or as a solo artist or working with techno legend Dasha Rush around Europe and Russia.)

Stas is happy to help you decipher the mysterious arts of TouchDesigner work yourself in his online workshop series. But you’ll probably want to start at the beginning – or even if you have some TouchDesigner background, better understand Stas’ take on it. Over the weekend, he led a free online workshop, and now you can watch at your leisure on YouTube:

If that taste has you excited, though, you might want to think about being in Montréal in August – timed perfectly with the massive MUTEK festival.

It’s not the first time there’s been an event around this tool, but this is surely the biggest. The day program alone features:

  • 350 participants
  • 69 presenters
  • 45 workshops
  • 21 talks

And that’s all in 3 days, packed onto the Coeur des Sciences / UQAM campus. The organizers describe it as “an intensive forum and stimulating meeting ground for the TouchDesigner community to share knowledge and experiences, learn new skills, connect in person with your favorite TD mentors and peeps and make a lot of new friends and collaborators.”

The night program promises still more, with an “after dark” social program, with 404.zero, ELEMAUN / Ali Phi, our friend Procedural, and Woulg.

TouchDesigner for its part has been expanding with lots of new features, including a specialized module for performing with lasers. That in turn is being used in the incredible collaboration of Robert Henke and Christopher Bauder – hope to cover that more soon:

Full details:

https://2019.touchdesignersummit.com/

And to check out Stas’ paid video courses:

https://lichtpfad.selz.com/

Image at top – deadmau5, prepping as his live show is built in TouchDesigner. Find lots more inspiration like this on the blog – I could page through that all day:

https://www.derivative.ca/Blog/

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