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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Tech


16″ MacBook Pro, a better MBP at 15″ prices, as Apple responds to user feedback

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 14 Nov 2019 10:04 am

Apple has a 16″ MacBook Pro that improves performance, adds a bigger, better display, and makes promising changes to the keyboard – without increasing price. Next question: should you upgrade?

Apple’s flagship laptops still command a price premium: standard configurations are US$2,399 and $2,799, which can be punishing for cash-strapped musicians (especially in other countries once accounting for currency and cash). Figure budgeting at least $2599 for 1TB storage, and then the $2799 standard price point bumps processor speed and graphics.

But as before, what you get in exchange for the luxe price is some luxe hardware. That’s always been especially true of the display. Even big fans of the price/performance ratio on PCs have got to concede that Apple ships some big, bright, color-accurate, gorgeous displays.

And the 16″ revision does three things:

  1. It sweetens the display deal with what might be the best laptop display on the market.
  2. It improves the performance-to-price ratio with upgraded specs for the processor, graphics, and battery. But maybe most importantly –
  3. It fixes the damned keyboard. (Or at least first impressions suggest so.)
Now with an Escape key – and while the Touch Bar is standard, improved keyboard performance means there’s not really anything in particular to gripe about, we hope.

The keyboard had held a lot of people back. The butterfly-action keyboard on past models prompted some complaints about key travel, and worse, were subject to reliability problems. I was unable to attend the press preview for the new Apple laptop, but journalists more experienced with those issues are so far impressed – Dieter Bohn for The Verge and Roman Loyala for Macworld each have their first hands-on impressions. Apple are confident enough that they’re dubbing the new keyboard Magic Keyboard, in a nod to their well-liked Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad (all the way back to the Steve Jobs era, actually).

You still get the Touch Bar whether you want it or not. But it’s no longer at the expense of a dedicated escape button (it’s back), and the fingerprint sensor now also gets its own dedicated control. Plus even the inverted-T directional keys are back.

Having tested the old keyboard, I have to say this is the MacBook Pro I would save up for. But I think the most encouraging thing about this is it means Apple was listening to complaints from pro users.

Also encouraging – you get more ports. You’ll still need adapters for a lot of gear (or a hub), but with USB-C evolving, having four USB-C ports that also double as Thunderbolt 3 (yeah, all four of them) makes this a machine that’s easy to connect.

Computers have largely caught up with the needs of most musicians, meaning all these extra performance specs won’t matter to anyone. But producers pushing the envelope should appreciate the new machines. All images courtesy Apple.

We’ll need a full review before we can judge the on-paper specs, but so far the indications are positive.

  • Ninth-generation CPUs (6- or 8-core, depending on model) from Intel – these will be great for running things like modeled synths (hello, VCV Rack), as well as CPU-native operations for visuals and so on.
  • 100 watt-hour battery (that’s the biggest battery approved to fly in the USA), for longer battery life
  • AMD Radeon Pro 5000M GPU with 4GB VRAM, option for 8GB

This is new generation AMD stuff, made just for Apple, though that also means it’s tough to make a direct comparison. As in past models in this line, it’s middle of the road stuff. Just remember that Apple likes to choose balanced GPUs as far as heat and power draw; they’re not making gaming laptops with big fans.

The relevant factor there is, you still don’t get to take advantage of NVIDIA-specific instructions and acceleration. I guess we’ll see if Apple are able to push Adobe to finally optimize Creative Suite for the Apple GPUs. (Right now, CS uses NVIDIA CUDA optimizations, and suffers quite a bit when it comes to performance on AMD chips. Of course, Apple will be happy if you use Final Cut Pro, at least on the video side.)

You can load up to 64GB of memory, though that’s overkill for even some sample playback applications and as usual is a fairly expensive build-to-order.

Speaking of nice options for deep pockets, you can also add an 8TB SSD. Please don’t drop this machine when riding your helicopter.

But to me, it’s really the display and slick form factor where Apple continues to reign supreme. And, wow, that new display –

  • 16‑inch (diagonal) LED‑backlit display with IPS technology; 3072‑by‑1920 native resolution at 226 pixels per inch with support for millions of colors
  • 500 nits brightness
  • Wide color P3 / True Tone
  • Refresh rates: 47.95Hz, 48.00Hz, 50.00Hz, 59.94Hz, 60.00Hz

So everything is great, and you should go buy this – well, maybe.

The Catalina factor

Now that Apple has successfully responded to MacBook Pro customer feedback, let’s see how they handle complaints from developers. Developers I talk to are still venting widespread frustration with glitches under macOS Catalina – and Catalina is installed by default. These go beyond just eliminating 32-bit code and adding expected security improvements. Many developers I’ve talked to tell me that the major changes made to the OS are producing unexpected glitches and challenges.

I wish I could be more specific – Apple, for their part, infamously emailed developers to ask them to stop being so negative in their communication. But I can say this: Apple changed a lot of security features at once, and then shipped that OS on a strict timetable. That introduces a lot of variability, because it doesn’t leave a lot of time for even Apple to respond to developer and user feedback, let alone their third-party ecosystem.

16″ is the one to watch

I think the 16″ machine is likely to be a great choice in the long run – just maybe not today. As with new OSes, patience is a virtue.

If you can keep dust away from the keys, it’s even worth considering a refurb 15″ model for significant cost savings, which is what CDM contributor and friend David Abravanel just did. (Since we don’t live on the same continent, he’s safe from me showing up every day with croissants to see if I can torture test his new baby.) The 16″ model is almost certainly better, but if you get a great deal, that’s another matter. And a new Apple launch is likely to flood the market, especially since there’s no price increase here.

The 16″ model does look like the new sweet spot for the Mac. I would just wait a little bit to get some detailed reviews of the new laptop, and to wait as Apple inevitably works on any bug fixes for this new machine generation and/or macOS Catalina. Plus third party developers are working really hard on support, meaning even a couple of months from now, you can expect a smoother Catalina switch experience than now.

By then, maybe we’ll see this keyboard rolled out on the more affordable, more mobile 13″ model, too.

And Windows laptops remain an option. With more and more music software offering essentially identical experiences across OSes to end users – even in a growing number of cases, on Linux – we’re in a competitive landscape for laptops for music and live visuals.

But that’s a good thing. And it’s great to see a new laptop from Apple that promises to be genuinely inspiring again – and what users actually want.

https://www.apple.com/macbook-pro-16/

The post 16″ MacBook Pro, a better MBP at 15″ prices, as Apple responds to user feedback appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

16″ MacBook Pro, a better MBP at 15″ prices, as Apple responds to user feedback

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 14 Nov 2019 10:04 am

Apple has a 16″ MacBook Pro that improves performance, adds a bigger, better display, and makes promising changes to the keyboard – without increasing price. Next question: should you upgrade?

Apple’s flagship laptops still command a price premium: standard configurations are US$2,399 and $2,799, which can be punishing for cash-strapped musicians (especially in other countries once accounting for currency and cash). Figure budgeting at least $2599 for 1TB storage, and then the $2799 standard price point bumps processor speed and graphics.

But as before, what you get in exchange for the luxe price is some luxe hardware. That’s always been especially true of the display. Even big fans of the price/performance ratio on PCs have got to concede that Apple ships some big, bright, color-accurate, gorgeous displays.

And the 16″ revision does three things:

  1. It sweetens the display deal with what might be the best laptop display on the market.
  2. It improves the performance-to-price ratio with upgraded specs for the processor, graphics, and battery. But maybe most importantly –
  3. It fixes the damned keyboard. (Or at least first impressions suggest so.)
Now with an Escape key – and while the Touch Bar is standard, improved keyboard performance means there’s not really anything in particular to gripe about, we hope.

The keyboard had held a lot of people back. The butterfly-action keyboard on past models prompted some complaints about key travel, and worse, were subject to reliability problems. I was unable to attend the press preview for the new Apple laptop, but journalists more experienced with those issues are so far impressed – Dieter Bohn for The Verge and Roman Loyala for Macworld each have their first hands-on impressions. Apple are confident enough that they’re dubbing the new keyboard Magic Keyboard, in a nod to their well-liked Magic Mouse and Magic Trackpad (all the way back to the Steve Jobs era, actually).

You still get the Touch Bar whether you want it or not. But it’s no longer at the expense of a dedicated escape button (it’s back), and the fingerprint sensor now also gets its own dedicated control. Plus even the inverted-T directional keys are back.

Having tested the old keyboard, I have to say this is the MacBook Pro I would save up for. But I think the most encouraging thing about this is it means Apple was listening to complaints from pro users.

Also encouraging – you get more ports. You’ll still need adapters for a lot of gear (or a hub), but with USB-C evolving, having four USB-C ports that also double as Thunderbolt 3 (yeah, all four of them) makes this a machine that’s easy to connect.

Computers have largely caught up with the needs of most musicians, meaning all these extra performance specs won’t matter to anyone. But producers pushing the envelope should appreciate the new machines. All images courtesy Apple.

We’ll need a full review before we can judge the on-paper specs, but so far the indications are positive.

  • Ninth-generation CPUs (6- or 8-core, depending on model) from Intel – these will be great for running things like modeled synths (hello, VCV Rack), as well as CPU-native operations for visuals and so on.
  • 100 watt-hour battery (that’s the biggest battery approved to fly in the USA), for longer battery life
  • AMD Radeon Pro 5000M GPU with 4GB VRAM, option for 8GB

This is new generation AMD stuff, made just for Apple, though that also means it’s tough to make a direct comparison. As in past models in this line, it’s middle of the road stuff. Just remember that Apple likes to choose balanced GPUs as far as heat and power draw; they’re not making gaming laptops with big fans.

The relevant factor there is, you still don’t get to take advantage of NVIDIA-specific instructions and acceleration. I guess we’ll see if Apple are able to push Adobe to finally optimize Creative Suite for the Apple GPUs. (Right now, CS uses NVIDIA CUDA optimizations, and suffers quite a bit when it comes to performance on AMD chips. Of course, Apple will be happy if you use Final Cut Pro, at least on the video side.)

You can load up to 64GB of memory, though that’s overkill for even some sample playback applications and as usual is a fairly expensive build-to-order.

Speaking of nice options for deep pockets, you can also add an 8TB SSD. Please don’t drop this machine when riding your helicopter.

But to me, it’s really the display and slick form factor where Apple continues to reign supreme. And, wow, that new display –

  • 16‑inch (diagonal) LED‑backlit display with IPS technology; 3072‑by‑1920 native resolution at 226 pixels per inch with support for millions of colors
  • 500 nits brightness
  • Wide color P3 / True Tone
  • Refresh rates: 47.95Hz, 48.00Hz, 50.00Hz, 59.94Hz, 60.00Hz

So everything is great, and you should go buy this – well, maybe.

The Catalina factor

Now that Apple has successfully responded to MacBook Pro customer feedback, let’s see how they handle complaints from developers. Developers I talk to are still venting widespread frustration with glitches under macOS Catalina – and Catalina is installed by default. These go beyond just eliminating 32-bit code and adding expected security improvements. Many developers I’ve talked to tell me that the major changes made to the OS are producing unexpected glitches and challenges.

I wish I could be more specific – Apple, for their part, infamously emailed developers to ask them to stop being so negative in their communication. But I can say this: Apple changed a lot of security features at once, and then shipped that OS on a strict timetable. That introduces a lot of variability, because it doesn’t leave a lot of time for even Apple to respond to developer and user feedback, let alone their third-party ecosystem.

16″ is the one to watch

I think the 16″ machine is likely to be a great choice in the long run – just maybe not today. As with new OSes, patience is a virtue.

If you can keep dust away from the keys, it’s even worth considering a refurb 15″ model for significant cost savings, which is what CDM contributor and friend David Abravanel just did. (Since we don’t live on the same continent, he’s safe from me showing up every day with croissants to see if I can torture test his new baby.) The 16″ model is almost certainly better, but if you get a great deal, that’s another matter. And a new Apple launch is likely to flood the market, especially since there’s no price increase here.

The 16″ model does look like the new sweet spot for the Mac. I would just wait a little bit to get some detailed reviews of the new laptop, and to wait as Apple inevitably works on any bug fixes for this new machine generation and/or macOS Catalina. Plus third party developers are working really hard on support, meaning even a couple of months from now, you can expect a smoother Catalina switch experience than now.

By then, maybe we’ll see this keyboard rolled out on the more affordable, more mobile 13″ model, too.

And Windows laptops remain an option. With more and more music software offering essentially identical experiences across OSes to end users – even in a growing number of cases, on Linux – we’re in a competitive landscape for laptops for music and live visuals.

But that’s a good thing. And it’s great to see a new laptop from Apple that promises to be genuinely inspiring again – and what users actually want.

https://www.apple.com/macbook-pro-16/

The post 16″ MacBook Pro, a better MBP at 15″ prices, as Apple responds to user feedback appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Game Boy music classic Nanoloop is coming to two dedicated mobile gadgets

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 13 Nov 2019 10:27 am

Nanoloop, the ingeniously simple pocket music-making tool, is being reborn. Two new dedicated pocket hardware devices promise to do what once required Nintendo’s Game Boy.

Nanoloop began its life as a home-brewed cartridge for the Nintendo Game Boy. The software shipped in the same physical format as classic games like Legend of Zelda – on a cartridge. That allowed the title to take advantage of the distinctive chip synth in the mainstream gaming hardware.

And Nanoloop was an instant hit, helping drive the explosion of the chip music scene. While some musicians swore by Nanoloop’s leading rival, Little Sound DJ [LSDJ], and its 90s-style tracker interface, Nanoloop stood out for its distinctive graphical design. Minimal elements onscreen belied powerful editing features, and opened up music-making to artists drawn to that aesthetic and way of working.

If you really want to be a purist, you’ll continue to run Nanoloop exactly like that, on the vintage hardware. And of course, there are also mobile OS versions now available, though they lose the tactile feel that’s part of the whole draw.

But now there’s a third way – run Nanoloop on new, dedicated gadgets, not made by Nintendo. (Not that Nintendo needs to worry about the competition – the target market here are typically rabid enough fans that they already own and extensively use Nintendo Switch!)

Incredibly, there are two separate projects inbound that offer new ways of running Nanoloop. Nanoloop’s own developer is building hardware designed just for music makers to run his creation. And separately, a project to make new hardware that runs the original cartridges includes the Nanoloop synth, built-in.

I mean, I kind of want both. (Santa Claus, if you’re listening…) Here’s the scoop:

Analogue Pocket

We have fewer details on Analogue Pocket, but imagine a sleek, black remake of the original, with a high-density display in place of the original lo-fi one. It isn’t a software emulator as such – it actually plays the original Game Boy cartridges from all the different generations (Game Boy, Game Boy Color, and Game Boy Advance). Those afternoons spent around the flea market are about to get way more interesting, then.

In place of the original specs, though, you get modern features – as though you stepped into a mirror universe. So the display is 665ppi and 1600×1440. The battery is lithium-ion with USB-C charging. There’s an SD card slot.

What’s potentially interesting to music users is that the developers have a built-in version of Nanoloop. That seems to be the newer Nanoloop 2. I don’t yet have information on the Analogue Pocket’s sound engine, though, which will be crucial detail for chip enthusiasts wanting to use this as an instrument. Even Nanoloop developer Oliver Wittchow told me he’s trying to learn more about this device.

One thing we have been able to confirm – Oliver says the creators tell him the Analogue Pocket will have correct audio pin compatibility. That means the nanoloop mono cartridge – nanoloop 1 – will be compatible with the new hardware.

Meanwhile, Oliver is designing his own hardware around his app. That’s less interesting to mainstream gadget and gaming press, but even more interesting to us. And Oliver is making progress.

Nanoloop Hardware

I covered the nanoloop hardware project and its Kickstarter campaign earlier this year:

What makes it special is really its hardware matrix design, with gamepads – it’s a never-before-seen hybrid of light-up physical grid and gaming-style joy/directional-pads. Or to put it another way, it’s the love child of a Game Boy Advance and a monome, part modern gadget, part nerdy DIY contraption.

And goddamn, son, this thing sounds sweet. Check out the update from late October:

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/734721310/nanoloop/posts/2665107

He’s dumped the dorky LEDs for a svelte, retro-futuristic set of dots on the main display – very nanoloop. The sound is exceptional, and it fits in your palm.

There’s also a post reflecting on form factor. The horizontal option seems to me a clear winner, and it’s stunning how much he’s fit in so small a space. It really for me outdoes even the tiny Teenage Engineering OP-Z in terms of economical user interface. I look forward to playing the two as a duo, though.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/734721310/nanoloop/posts/2628067

Don’t take my word for it, though. Follow the Kickstarter campaign and check out his sound demos, as Oliver has produced a unique instrument for lovers of tiny electronic musical things. If you’re feeling eager for this to arrive, I am, too, so we’ll keep you posted on how the work is coming.

Image at top: “Nanoloop in C” by v8media is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The post Game Boy music classic Nanoloop is coming to two dedicated mobile gadgets appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

HUMAN EXTINCTION PARTY is all the AI-generated gore and death metal you can stream

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 11 Nov 2019 4:48 pm

If we’ve learned one thing about artificial intelligence, machine learning, and music generation, it’s that AI makes some damned fine death metal.

I mean, sure, part of why machine learning doesn’t really replace humans in its present form is this very phenomenon you’re hearing. If you put audio content of pre-existing music into a blender and then mathematically spew bits of it out, you’re losing all the nuance of form and compositional intent that make a lot of music genres work in the first place.

But back up – what was that bit about spewing things out of a blender?

If that part sounded like a feature, not a bug, then you sound like just the sort of person who will love AI-generated death metal. I am that sort of person, despite being about nuance and form and compositional intent, uh, most of the time. (At least I normally pretend.) And I’ve written about this before.

But now, it’s worth mentioning because HUMAN EXTINCTION PARTY 😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖🔪😵🗡️🤖 is amazing.

It’s a livestream of this stuff, just when the creators, Dadabots, have taken down a lot of their other streams. I realize this came out on the 25th of October, ostensibly for Halloween, which now is of course past. But I would implore Databots to keep this up, and the AI-generated text playing karaoke-style over images of meat, on through Christmas. (Honestly, this makes me feel a lot less murderous than hearing “Last Christmas.” If I seem to be getting stabby and Wham! is on, play this to calm me down and watch the butcher knife slide from my placid fingers.)

And yes, you should read their research paper:

Generating Albums with SampleRNN to Imitate Metal, Rock, and Punk Bands

More on SampleRNN:

http://deepsound.io/samplernn_first.html

I still think this will not really turn into a generative model for music, but could turn into a far more interesting way of processing your own samples than only looping them, by generating larger-scale textures out of existing material. If I’m wrong, you can flay my skin and … okay, now I’ve been listening to too much of this stream.

I’m in the midst of our AI Music Lab with MUTEK.jp, so more on this topic – and not just skin deep – soon.

Go go Databots:

http://dadabots.com/faq.php

And yes, if you really want to have an argument about authorship and this stuff, you should probably go talk to your MPC, too.

Also, Hatebeak forever. (And yeah, CDM has been going for 15 years – and if you got the Hatebeak reference, probably you’ve been reading roughly that long.)

The post HUMAN EXTINCTION PARTY is all the AI-generated gore and death metal you can stream appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Behringer 303 clones revealed: $199 street

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 11 Nov 2019 4:31 pm

Behringer’s analog remake of the 303 is now out in the open – a $199 set of red, blue, and silver synths called the TD-3.

On one hand, this might be the least exceptional of the low-cost Behringer synths, in that there are a lot of 303 remakes around already. There are boutique models, things called “Boutique” from Roland, the open-source hardware x0xb0x and its ilk (which even served as a template to open source music hardware generally), and plug-ins and software emulations galore.

On the other hand, the same thing makes the TD-3 newsworthy. It’s a synth everyone knows, and it’s now US$199 street. Get ready for a lot more acid — that’s for sure.

So what did Behringer actually do?

The TD-3 roughly approximates the TB-303 layout, without being slavish. And Behringer says they’ve recreated the essential analog circuits, down to the matched transistors.

It’s easier, then, to describe what’s new – apart from seeing a Behringer logo instead of a Roland one.

There’s a distortion circuit, which Behringer says is modeled on the DS-1. That presumably means a BOSS DS-1. And that’s actually the ballsy move here; Behringer has tangled with Roland before over BOSS.

The sequencer functionality borrows the 303’s interactions, but there’s more here – an arpeggiator, 250 user patterns x 7 tracks, and an intriguing ppq (parts per quarter) setting.

There’s also more I/O, bringing this more in line with a hacked/modded 303 than the original. You get USB, MIDI, and filter in / sync in / CV out / gate out, in addition to the original’s basic sync features.

Behringer are offering this in three colors, which otherwise are functionally identical – so TD-3-BU, RD, and SR are blue, red, and silver, respectively.

It’s really the price that’s the big deal, at US$199. That mainly hurts the Roland TB-03, which has a street of nearly twice that. Now, I don’t much expect anyone to dump the TB-03 – it sounds great whether it’s analog or not, it’s got a delay/reverb this lacks, and it runs on batteries. For that matter, I don’t know that people will dump any of their existing 303 emulations.

But for someone picking up the 303 who doesn’t have one, it’s going to be tough to compete with Behringer.

On the other hand, Behringer now joins a lot of low-cost, cool synths. Synthtopia compares the TD-3 with the KORG volca NuBass. I don’t know if that comparison came from Behringer, but the KORG seems like a totally different animal – different sound, different features, different workflow, and you know, a volca.

https://www.behringer.com/search/Behringer?text=TD-3

My question is – who’s going to use some strange bass sound to invent a new musical genre? It feels like we’re due.

I know, I know – “Karplus-Strong Techno” is really not a thing like acid house.

Okay – can someone make that a thing?

The post Behringer 303 clones revealed: $199 street appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

MOTU’s new audio interfaces may finally be what we all need – $169.95

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 8 Nov 2019 3:13 pm

The no-compromise and entry-level audio interface – it’s something that should be impossible, but MOTU might have just cracked it.

I have literally been trying to pack suitcases for a long trip, staring at audio interfaces because I can’t find the one that does what I need. I’ve been equally stumped sometimes asking inevitable questions from friends about what they should buy.

MOTU has always made great audio interfaces. But many of them require drivers, which means your Linux-running laptop with Bitwig Studio or your iPad with those great new Eventide apps are both out of luck. Or they don’t fit a small budget.

So the M2 / M4 genuinely surprised me. They have the specs of a high-end box from MOTU or others, but they start at US$169.95 and at last they also work with every OS, all squeezed into a portable package.

Here’s what you might not expect:

High-end converters

2.5 ms latency with their drivers

A high-res color screen and built-in metering (unheard of at this price)

RCA outs? MIDI I/O? Sure!

But that’s not why I say they’re really no-compromise (though the high-end converters surely go there). MOTU did their own custom USB drivers for ultra low-latency performance on Mac and Windows but they also made this class-compliant – so it doesn’t need drivers on Linux or iOS or Android.

And then the pricing is stupidly nice.

So finally, one little box does everything – and if you get into the iPad or Android or Raspberry Pi, you don’t have to go buy another interface.

Yes, these are USB-C but that will also connect to your existing USB A connection.

Promising stuff – I’ll be interested to pick one to review (or pick up one to hopefully keep).

Full specs from MOTU:

• 2-in / 2-out and 4-in / 4-out USB audio interfaces with studio-quality sound
• Best-in-class audio quality driven by ESS Sabre32 Ultra™ DAC Technology
• Best-in-class speed (ultra-low latency) for host software processing
• Best-in-class metering for all inputs/outputs with a full-color LCD
• 2x mic/line/hi-Z guitar inputs on combo XLR/TRS
• Individual preamp gain and 48V phantom power for each input
• 2x balanced 1/4-inch line inputs (M4 only)
• Hardware (direct) monitoring for each input
• Monitor mix knob to balance live inputs and computer playback (M4 only)
• Measured -129 dB EIN on mic inputs
• Balanced, DC-coupled 1/4-inch TRS outputs (2x for M2; 4x for M4)
• Measured 120 dB dynamic range on the 1/4-inch balanced TRS outputs
• RCA (unbalanced) analog outs that mirror 1/4-inch outs (2x for M2; 4x for M4)
• 1x headphone out (driven by ESS converters) with independent volume control
• MIDI in/out
• Support for 44.1 to 192 kHz sample rates
• USB audio class compliant for plug-and-play operation on Mac (no driver required)
• Windows driver with 2.5 ms Round Trip Latency (32 sample buffer at 96 kHz)
• Mac driver (optional, for 2.5 ms RTL@32/96 kHz and loopback feature)
• iOS compatible (USB audio class compliant) 
• Driver loopback for capturing host output, live streaming and podcasting
• Bus powered USB-C (compatible with USB Type A) with power switch (USB cable included)
• Rugged metal construction
• Workstation software included (MOTU Performer Lite 10 and Ableton Live Lite 10)
• 100+ instruments (in Performer Lite)
• Over 6 GB of included free loops, samples and one-shots from industry leading libraries
• Kensington security slot
• Built in the USA
• Two-year warranty

Now shipping, $169.95 for the 2×2 M2, or if you want 4 ins and 4 outs, $219.95 for the M4.

https://new.motu.com/en-us/products/m-series/m2/

https://new.motu.com/en-us/products/m-series/m4/

The post MOTU’s new audio interfaces may finally be what we all need – $169.95 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Faderfox EC4 gives you the encoders your hardware, software are missing

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 6 Nov 2019 5:05 pm

Boutique German maker Faderfox has long been a go-to for controllers. The latest compact box looks like the encoder box to end all encoder boxes.

Hands-on control is everything, of course. You’ve got some particular parameter in your Ableton Live set, or your VCV Rack or Reaktor patch, or your favorite plug-in. Or there’s some particular gear parameters that are hidden behind menus and don’t have dedicated controls. So normally begins the dance of juggling a bunch of cheap, plastic controllers that too often break, or are meant for a particular piece of software, or feel flimsy and unsatisfying when you touch them, or just don’t have the layout you need.

Video performance can be even worse – and even less forgiving of low-resolution standard MIDI mapping, as stuff jitters across giant projection and LED walls because your crap MIDI controller has only 127 values.

The generic layout of the Faderfoxes has been a salve for this wound. Developer Matthias has been slowly evolving his “box full of stuff you can turn” concept. There were knobs, then there were encoders. Then there were push-button encoders, then ones that let you map the push function.

The EC4 is the latest evolution, and it puts everything in one place – and adds a screen, solving the problem of having to remember your mappings. (Though, hey, uh, happy accidents make you creative? No?)

There are encoders that can work as high-resolution encoders, too (14-bit) for more detailed precision.

But it’s really the display that makes this interesting. It’s a 4×20 character OLED, so small but still clear enough that you can see what you’re doing.

And you can customize the labels directly. You can do that on the device – Matthias has cleverly mapped the grid of 4×4 encoders to the old T9 layout used on cell phones, so think rapid-fire SMS rather than scrolllllllling through letters like on old arcade machines. That means this works without a computer handy. If you do happen to have a computer nearby, there’s an EC4 editor you can run directly from your browser in Chrome/Chromium.

Oh yeah, that editor is even open source.

https://github.com/privatepublic-de/faderfox-editor

The EC4 is pricier than other Faderfox options, at 251EUR before VAT (about $278) or EUR 299 if you’re in Europe. (If you’re on a budget, check for models right before they’re retired, as they tend to get discounted.)

But with all these advanced features in a compact size, I think it’s really appealing. There are plenty of low-resolution boxes with knobs and pots, but when you need some nuance and flexibility, this looks hard to beat – and essential for those of us in love with software like VCV Rack.

Specs:

  • Universal controller for all kinds of midi controllable hard- and software
  • iPad compatible
  • Control surface script for Ableton Live is shipped with the controller
  • USB interface – class compliant / bus powered / no driver necessary (consumption < 500mW)
  • MIDI in and out ports by 3.5mm minijack sockets type B with routing and merge functionality
  • 16 gridless push encoders – resolution = 36 pulses per revolution
  • Encoder push buttons can send separate commands
  • 4 x 20 character OLED-display to show control values (numeric/bar), names and programming data
  • Names for encoders, groups and setups are editable (4 characters per name)
  • 14 bit high resolution encoder mode for sensitive parameters
  • Programmable value ranges with min/max values
  • Data feedback avoid value jumps
  • All encoders fully programmable in the device by channel, type, number, mode, name etc.
  • Different command types like control change (CC), pitch bend, NRPN, program change and notes
  • Advanced programming functions like copy, paste and fill
  • 16 independent groups per setup for 16 encoders (256 commands per setup)
  • Learn function for fast assignment to incoming MIDI commands
  • 16 setups with backup/restore function contain all controller settings incl. names
  • Very compact design in a black casing (180x105x70 mm, 350 g)

I’m definitely saving some cash for one. The Faderfox stuff I own endures like nothing else.

http://www.faderfox.de/ec4.html

The post Faderfox EC4 gives you the encoders your hardware, software are missing appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

“Never chase a ghost”: Roland says analog remakes aren’t coming

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 5 Nov 2019 5:35 pm

Roland is on-record in an interview about the new JUPITER-X & Xm that they’re not planning an analog remake – but that’s not actually what’s most revealing in the story.

It’s encouraging to see that the CEO of Roland, Jun-ichi Miki, is also an engineer. His latest comments on the Jupiter site are likely to frustrate fans who want analog remakes of Roland gear – and it comes with especially poor timing, as Behringer has just announced an analog remake of the TB-303 and profits from other low-cost analog remakes of other Roland gear.

But let’s read what he said and pick it apart:

We are very aware of the very strong passion that synth fans have for the JUPITER-8, and some continue to wait for us to introduce a true analog version. This is something we do not plan to do. Our founder Mr. Kakehashi always said, “Never chase a ghost”, and I really understand his meaning. “Chasing the ghost” of the original JUPITER-8 or TR-808 does not make sense as we will never catch them, and this effort would not align with our vision for the future.

The JUPITER-X & Xm Story [official Roland Blog]

I actually like the “chase the ghost” line. Now Synth Anatomy for its part points out (correctly) that Roland is remaking its past instruments, just using digital tech. But that descends into a predictable analog versus digital argument.

Here’s the thing: the digital remakes are a step forward. They allow battery power and completely stable tuning. The Boutique series are pretty conservative, adding modest features like new voice architectures or sequencing or the JUNO-106/60 switch on the JU-06A, all arguably part of that digital remake.

But on instruments like the TR-8S, you in fact get a big benefit from the digital reboot. I get an instrument that is A/B comparable to the sound of an original TR-808, but I can also mix my own samples and onboard effects, save elaborate presets, and take advantage of new sequencing and customization features, all in ways that the 808 can’t do.

It’s just not entirely clear what people want from analog remakes. Plenty of new instruments have proven that both analog and digital implementations can be viable, affordable, and musical. When it comes to remaking old analog circuitry, there are modeling efforts – Roland’s own circuit behavior tech being just one – that can produce compelling results.

It’s not likely to inflame as many online commenters, but I think the more telling admission from Roland is about their most recent crop of hardware.

We invested a huge amount of time and money to develop a new system-on-a-chip called BMC, which stands for Behavior Modeling Core. Proprietary to Roland, BMC contains a large array of DSP and CPU core blocks plus hardware logic; it is incredibly powerful.

ZEN-Core is an expandable and customizable synthesizer engine running on BMC, and is the heart of the new JUPITER, FANTOM, and GROOVEBOX synth instruments. The combination of BMC and ZEN-Core are like a highly tuned F1 racing engine for sound synthesis.

At the base level, ZEN-Core integrates next-generation PCM and Virtual Analog, with advanced features such as new Virtual Analog oscillators, precisely modeled filters, ultra-fast and smooth envelopes and LFOs, high-resolution parameters, and expandability. The JUPITER-X Series uses one of the first product-specific expansions to the base engine, Analog Behavior Modeling or ABM, which is the technology behind the Model Bank feature. For your interest, the second product-specific expansion to ZEN-Core is V-Piano on the new FANTOM synths.

Here’s where we get into some Roland logic. Roland has two technologies now, one called Analog Circuit Behavior (ACB) and another is now called Analog Behavior Modeling (ABM). The name ABM is newer, but the actual tech for ABM appears to be older. But there’s a hedge here – ACB does more to actually emulate the way physical circuits behave. This isn’t only significant to remakes; it can also be employed in new instruments, as was done on the SYSTEM-1 and SYSTEM-8. And it brings Roland’s sound engines beneath the hood closer in line with recent developments in modeling filters and other features now found in current-generation desktop software instruments, software modular, and even some digital hardware modules.

Roland seems to have backpedaled on their more computationally expensive and innovative ACB, and the superior sound of the Boutique and AIRA products, and gone back to just cramming gear with a bunch of PCM and previous generation virtual analog.

Now to be fair, they reveal why – customers want more polyphony and more features. And sure enough, the response to the new FANTOM synths has been positive.

I can’t really argue with what the market wants – though it also sort of proves the point that you should tune out some of what you see on forums.

Still, it’ll be disappointing if Roland is abandoning some of what has powered some of their best hardware of the last couple of generations. And it’s doubly disappointing when that gear is being unfairly knocked for using digital technology.

Look, there is nothing wrong with employing PCM or repurposing old tech. And to look to another Japanese model, Nintendo has done amazing work by chasing real functionality for customers rather than spec sheets. The problem is if that becomes a stand-in for fresh design, because then usability can suffer.

Instruments in the AIRA line – including the SYSTEM-1 and SYSTEM-8 – were driven around new sound engines and hardware workflows built around those sound engines.

I really want to like the GROOVEBOX – I’m finishing my review of the MC-101 now, and it shows some potential. But part of why it’s taking me so long is that this product has some disappointing limitations and confusing workflow elements that are side effects of this recycled approach. (As some veteran Roland sound designers noted, the MC-101 even has banks of sounds from the FANTOM line.) And it means we won’t get what might have been the perfect new Roland gear, incorporating both the models of the TR-808 in the TR-8S and the new sequencing, clip launching, and time stretch/repitch features. Or, for that matter, imagine if the GROOVEBOX line had the ability to load longer samples, or to stream from SD card, or to load samples from the computer, as almost all of its competitors can. Or imagine if there were a working desktop or browser editor (think what Novation did with the much cheaper Circuit). Or, to get greedy, what if there were an ACB-powered synth engine in a GROOVEBOX? That would be a must-buy.

From my perspective, there’s way too much in the new FANTOM and GROOVEBOX products that comes straight out of Roland gear from 10 years ago or even further back. (It’s terrifyingly easy to compare the new grooveboxes to ones from before the turn of the century.)

Roland may not be chasing ghosts, but they run the risk of repackaging them. And the industry isn’t standing still – that could put them at a disadvantage to other gear makers embracing a more futuristic approach.

So yeah, don’t be afraid of clones. But, Roland, some of us are really rooting for you to protect innovation and innovative teams in the company.

Feature image: “roland jupiter 6” by Francesco Romito is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

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Finish music faster in Ableton Live 10 with these Arrangement View tips

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 4 Nov 2019 6:43 pm

Ableton Live is best known for its Session View grid, but the faster you are with Arrangement View, the more fluidly you can compose finished tracks. I put together a quick reference tutorial to help you work faster.

I’m pleased for this project to get to partner with Riemann Kollektion here in Berlin. Virtuoso techno producer and DJ/live act Florian Meindl heads Riemann as a label for sound content, mastering, nerdy apparel, and now various resources for honing your craft. Riemann is really a story in itself – it’s the natural evolution of electronic music business, catering to a world with more producers and DJs. Instead of lamenting the proliferation of music makers and the diminishing value of records, Florian is adapting, by serving that new market, while still remaining focused on the artists and sound of underground techno.

To me, being able to work quickly in a DAW means the power to make the tool disappear. It means shortening the distance between an idea and its execution. And Ableton have made some significant workflow changes in Live 10 and Live 10.1, which mean this is worth revisiting.

My basic strategy is this:

  • Exploit Scenes in Session View to make your basic song structure
  • Map parameters so you can not only mix, but tweak devices in real time
  • Learn the latest keyboard shortcuts to focus the display on your work, without mousing around
  • Adjust envelopes more directly and draw shapes
  • Use time operations and bounces to make big changes

I also point to some third-party tools that add additional power and control.

Check out the full tutorial:

Tutorial: Super Fast Arrangement in Ableton Live 10

And I’d love your feedback on additional tips to add. (Florian and I will keep updating it.) Plus if there’s another tool you’d like to see covered, let us know – especially if you’ve worked out some tips in your tool of choice.

The post Finish music faster in Ableton Live 10 with these Arrangement View tips appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Now is your last chance to register for Ableton Loop, coming to Berlin, April 2020

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Sun 3 Nov 2019 3:46 pm

After an edition in LA and a half-year break, the music-making summit hosted by Ableton is coming home to Berlin. Monday is your last chance to register if you want a chance to join.

After Live and Push, Loop has become a kind of third major product from Ableton. It isn’t an event about Live – Ableton’s software and hardware have seemed almost subdued in their role as the event has grown. It has instead become Ableton’s own contribution to bringing together the community of makers around their tools, with a strong emphasis on the diversity of that community – both in the people and how they work. (I’ve been at each edition.)

This year’s edition seems more than any before to promise to bring that full range of diversity back to the Berlin home base. So they’ve added Sylvia Massy, the experienced engineer who worked with the likes of Johnny Cash, REM, and Tool. But there’s also Mexican Sotomayor, continuing Loop’s interest in mixing electronic production with live instrumentation. There’s vocalist Colin Self, percussionist Evelyn Glennie, and the quartet Ex-Easter Island Head.

Very pleased Antenes is on the artist roster for this year – she embodies the spirit of creative production and DIY in her work, so CDM readers, take note.

That’s not to say tech or electronic music is getting short shrift. I’m really looking forward to seeing Antenes and Eric Pitra, who build their own instruments. Antenes, aka Lori Napoleon, is a singular personality who is both able to hold down epic techno sets around the world, and construct wild new experimental DIY instruments from telephone switchboards.

And we’re getting folks like the wondeful Deena Abdelwahed and Georgia Anne Muldrow, as well. It looks like a killer lineup, and clearly the Loop team continue to build on what is resonating with their audiences.

So, now is your chance. Monday the 4th is the deadline. A full pass is 275 EUR (or 375 EUR with one of the valuable workshops and studio sessions), but there are student and youth passes available (for 18-26 year olds), plus crucially subsidized passes for just 50 EUR which still include a studio session and workshop. (Details on who get subsidized are at the site.)

Ableton didn’t put me up to this – this isn’t an advert. I can’t think of anyone else in our industry doing anything like this. And the team at Loop have made an extraordinary commitment to removing boundaries based on gender, genre, age, and cultural background, as well as employing a strict code of conduct to make their spaces safe.

Of course, the one barrier to entry is, you do have to get yourself to Berlin and there are limited passes available.

And time remains a barrier. (Sorry, nothing we can do about that!) So you need submit by tomorrow Monday November 4, and then best of luck – I hope some CDM readers luck out in the drawing (or even with youth passes or subsidies).

You can do that here:

https://loop.ableton.com/2020/register/

https://loop.ableton.com/2020/

And here are some 2018 highlights, to either inspire you to register or, if you can’t, to let you sit back and make a little virtual Loop for youself in the comfort of your own home. (Now that’s also a nice way to spend a Sunday!)

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Abyss is a free doom effect for Max for Live – happy Halloween!

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 31 Oct 2019 7:40 pm

Subtle, nuanced, transparent, almost inaudible sonic adjustment? No – let’s kick things into the deep, terrifying flaming pits of Hell. Meet Abyss.

So, yes, it’s Halloween. That means even if you don’t have a costume, you can make up for it by grabbing this free Max for Live device and plugging in a microphone. (Say your costume is “audio engineer.” Pretty much anything works.)

But the cats at Max for Cats have put together a wonderfully disturbing audio effect in “Abyss” that I’m sure some of us will use year-round. Their description says it:

… lets you forward any input signal into the abyss. The result is an ominous, gory and hellish version of your original input signal. Use with extreme caution and only if you have a strong, sane mind.

Sorry, what was that last bit? I tuned it out. Never mind.

What’s actually here: repitching, reverb, delay with feedback, but all mashed together in a truly wonderfully demented way. So you get precise controls for damping, tail, spread, early reflections, flanging delay feedback, modulation rate and depth, and pitch presets.

Plus included Mirror, Cat, and Crow at no additional cost.

As it’s a Max for Live device, you’ll need Ableton Live 10 or later and a Max for Live license (included in Live Suite).

The post Abyss is a free doom effect for Max for Live – happy Halloween! appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Listen to ambient sound from around the world, recorded with a 4’33” app

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 31 Oct 2019 6:31 pm

To anyone who says there are too many music makers in the world, maybe you aren’t aware of how much sound is in the world. Crowd-sourced iPhone recordings and the ghost of John Cage are here to set you straight.

First, there’s the app – the 4’33” app is an official, licensed app that makes field recordings to the exact specifications of John Cage’s infamous score as premiered in 1952 by pianist David Tudor. And yes, that means it even comes in the score’s original three movements – a fun fact you should definitely share at parties. (Hey, where did everybody go?)

The app has been out since 2014, courtesy John Cage Trust and publisher C.F. Peters. (Yes, C.F. Peters still owns the rights to a score that contains … nothing.) It’s $0.99 – a small price to pay for… well, for a new way of perceiving all the sounds of the world, maybe?

What’s really astounding about this is not so much the app, though, as the collection of sounds the app has made worldwide. And that has grown in the half decade since the app’s release. You might expect them to all be clustered around New York, San Francisco, and London, but instead six of the seven continents are represented. The iPhone microphone is pretty decent at recording a general monophonic ambience – a fancier stereo recording would do better, sure, but the phone somehow makes a representation of how we perceive and remember those spaces. So you can have a charming journey around the planet and its sounds.

And I think to myself, what a wonderful world…

4’33” App for iPhone [App site and interactive map with sounds]

The post Listen to ambient sound from around the world, recorded with a 4’33” app appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

mutateful is a must-have, free live coding tool for Ableton Live

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 29 Oct 2019 2:54 pm

mutateful brings live coding – real-time musical pattern manipulation, expressed as code – to Ableton Live. And it looks like a must-have for arrangement and composition, too.

So yes, there are knobs and faders and pads and keys and wind inputs and whatnot for playing music live. And then there are the often clunky graphical interfaces found in music software. The core of live coding is all about finding that immediacy of compositional ideas – being able to get directly to patterns.

mutateful lets you do that by typing directly into the Session View of Ableton Live. That paradigm isn’t new to Live – the software already lets you enter tempo changes in scenes by including the number. mutateful just takes that idea way further out.

Type transformations into clips, and those clips then transform patterns inside the clips. You can add simple transformations, or chain a bunch together.

Some of the tasks those transformations can accomplish:

  • Arpeggiate
  • Combine clips (in various ways)
  • Change length (via cropping or setting to certain lengths)
  • Filter out notes by length
  • Remove silences
  • Remove overlaps, making polyphonic clips monophonic
  • Quantize
  • Create stuttering retriggers
  • Rescale pitches
  • Shuffle
  • Slice notes into divisions
  • Transpose

And you can do all of this by clip, musical fractions (like 1/8 notes), and whole or decimal numbers.

Watch just how cool this is:

It’s a pretty radical addition to Live, and arguably more radical than anything we’ve seen officially from Ableton Live in the software itself for years. But it’s still fairly simple.

I almost hesitate to categorize this as live coding, because it looks really useful in arrangement relative to the GUI, and you might not use it as a livecoder would onstage. (I do expect this means people will invade live coding events running this, though.)

Documentation is limited to a quick reference, but it’s fairly easy to follow and more is coming.

How it works: it’s actually a native app, made for macOS and Windows, which then communicates with the Live API via Max for Live and UDP. That means the usual qualification is involved – you’ll need the latest version of Ableton Live and a license for Max for Live (either separately or as part of Live Suite). That could open up this idea to other software with APIs / scripting interfaces of their own.

You can grab it from GitHub and check out more examples:

https://github.com/carrierdown/mutateful

The post mutateful is a must-have, free live coding tool for Ableton Live appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Blackhole routes audio between Mac apps, even on Catalina, as ideal Soundflower alternative

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 28 Oct 2019 1:19 am

Need to record audio from an app, or route sound from one tool to another? Blackhole is an easy, free way to do that on the Mac, right through the latest macOS Catalina.

The utility Soundflower got some brand recognition among music and audio nerds after its introduction way back in 2004, but that tool is now largely defunct. It’s based on now-deprecated Mac tools, so fine for older machines, but fairly useless for newer Macs running the latest OS. JACK audio is a powerful option across platforms, and it’s especially powerful and easy on Linux, on which platform developers are more likely to write native clients. But it was never as friendly to new users as Soundflower.

Blackhole gives you more of that sort of simplicity, with modern updates – including full support for macOS Catalina that has eluded some other tools. Basically, look to Soundflower for older OSes, and consider Blackhole for 10.10 (Yosemite) and later, especially if you’re up to Mojave or Catalina.

You get 16 channels of audio (configurable up to 256 if you need that for some reason), lots of sample rates, and – as with the other solutions mentioned here – zero latency.

It’s pretty simple stuff, and my initial tests suggest this it’s solid. I think given the pace of Apple’s updates, the actively developed Mac-specific tool here wins:

https://github.com/ExistentialAudio/BlackHole

This triggered a lively discussion after the developer mentioned it on Reddit:

By the way, it’s interesting that users expect a tool made for macOS audio architectures to work on Windows. Since most pro audio tasks rely on ASIO, you’ll want to use that architecture for inter-app audio routing.

On Windows and ASIO, for a cross-platform implementation, JACK really is your best bet. In the past, that meant some complex installation, but there’s now an easy guide:

https://jackaudio.org/faq/jack_on_windows.html

Some tools also come with their own virtual ASIO driver, like ReaRoute in Reaper:

https://wiki.cockos.com/wiki/index.php/ReaRoute

For a flexible driver that runs without requiring software to support ASIO, I recommend LoopBeAudio. It’s paid, but from a great developer who’s really focused on Windows support:

https://www.nerds.de/en/loopbeaudio.html

While you’re there, that’s also the best way to route MIDI between apps on Windows. Check out LoopBe1 – it’s good enough that I don’t even miss the native tools I use on macOS and Linux:

https://www.nerds.de/en/loopbe1.html

JACK remains the tool that works everywhere, but I do make use of these specific tools for the Mac and Windows. Let us know how Blackhole is working for you, if you’ve found an interesting use case, and if you run into trouble.

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This is the new MeeBlip thru5 kit, and it’s free with our geode synth for 48 hours

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 22 Oct 2019 12:37 pm

We’ve got a new kit that’s indispensable for your gear. So hey, let’s celebrate Black Friday really early. Buy a MeeBlip synth, get a MIDI splitter kit for free.

The thru5 is a new MeeBlip kit. It’s a splitter (also known as a thru box), whatever messages are sent to the MIDI IN jack gets simultaneously passed through to all five MIDI OUT jacks. It’s perfect for routing clock in a jam session, for instance.

The board is mostly assembled; all you have to do is solder on the MIDI jacks and (for power) the USB port. That’s about as easy as electronics soldering gets, meaning the thru5 makes a good kit if you’re just getting started with soldering. For everyone else, you’ll put it together quickly and have a useful tool.

Our geode synthesizer is in stock right now, so we’re making this easy to buy both: order a geode, and get a thru5 free, while supplies last.

But hurry: the offer runs just through Wednesday October 23, 23:59 West Coast time.

Check out the MeeBlip thru5.

And get it free when you buy geode. Plus, we’ve got free standard shipping on now.

About MeeBlip geode

If you’re not already familiar with geode, here’s why you’ll want our hardware synth – and now you’ve got a great excuse to get one right now.

Q&A

Can I use the USB port to make this a USB MIDI interface?

No – USB is just for power on thru5. If you want a USB MIDI interface, check out cubit go.

Isn’t there already a MeeBlip thru box?

Yep, we also make the cubit splitter, which comes in a rugged case and features vertical-mount jacks, and doesn’t require soldering. We had a chance to make thru5 really affordable and easy as a kit, so we wanted to offer it to you.

Why is it already partly assembled? I want to do everything myself!

Hey, more power to you – but this is the most reliable, cost-effective way to offer up this particular kit, so we kept it simple.

Will you make more kits?

That depends on you – let us know if you like this, and what you’d want to see.

Get MeeBlip geode now, with free thru5 [expires 23:59 Wednesday October 22!]

Get MeeBlip thru5 kit (free with geode for 48 hours, $19.95 after that)

The post This is the new MeeBlip thru5 kit, and it’s free with our geode synth for 48 hours appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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