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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Windows


Valhalla Supermassive is the reverb at the end of the universe – and it’s free

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 19 May 2020 8:11 pm

How big is it? The latest from developer Sean Costello has networks of delays up to two seconds - as in, each delay - for lush shorter reverberation all the way to epic stretches of minutes at a time.

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Get lost in stupidly ace sounds and imagery of the algorave, then get smarter and make your own

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 6 May 2020 5:36 pm

Algorave culture has been training years for this – it’s an audiovisual form that can make even a screen and streamed sound really come alive. Just watch – and actually, don’t just watch, here’s how to learn, too. Normally, algorave articles talk breathlessly about code, blah blah, people coding on screen, isn’t that nerdy, look […]

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Rekordbox 6: Ableton Link, sync with Dropbox and Beatport and promos, find lost tracks, more

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 14 Apr 2020 5:03 pm

Pioneer’s Rekordbox continues its play to be the DJ software to beat – and there’s a ton of stuff in the latest release pretty much everyone will want, from cloud and mobile sync all the way up to some powerful live visual features.

There’s a ton of stuff here, whether you’re primarily using Rekordbox as your library management tool before you play with CDJs, or if it’s what you actually play in (or run live visual shows and lights in).

Ableton Link.

Cloud sync. You can sync tracks across devices and apps with Dropbox, and integrate with Beatport Link service, so that you aren’t constantly looking for promos and tracks you’ve bought. That also includes metadata – so –

iOS Mobile Sync. You can edit tracks on the companion iOS app, with your metadata in the cloud – meaning you have a palm-sized way of adding markers and adjusting beat sync. This will be especially great when any of us can leave the house again, but maybe by then we can also wish for an Android app? (And until then, hey, lying in bed going through tracks also has some appeal.)

Integrated promos. Inflyte is already the whiz-bang promo platform to beat – basically, it gives you all you need to send press and DJs your tracks and try to get them to send you useful feedback. (It’s the new place to get “Downloaded for R Hawtin” and later claim that was “supported by.”)

Now those promos show right in Rekordbox, so presumably producers can skip the steps of DJs digging through promo inboxes when they make mixes. I have more to say on this topic soon, but for now it’s an intriguing idea.

Combine that with Beatport Link, and at least in theory, there are more ways to get your music played by DJs, though whether that becomes overwhelming or even useful to the producer is a topic for another time.

Autorelocate Tracks. Don’t know about y’all, but I think I’m more excited by this than anything else here – especially since not all my promos come from Inflyte and not all my music from Beatport.

But all my music is now scattered on my hard drive in novel ways that Rekordbox 5 couldn’t handle.

I bet I’m not alone. At the very least, if this sounds like you, I promise you a comprehensive test of what happens when someone has zero interest in organizing files and zero patience in software’s general ineptitude at, you know, search. Fingers crossed on this one.

Updated UI. Now also has light/dark skin settings to match your OS.

3Band waveform. Humankind still struggles to work out how to provide a useful visualization of sound data. This takes waveforms and breaks them up by high, mid, low. Let’s see if that’s useful.

Filter by Attribute in Collection and playlists – handy.

Plus more visual goodies

Rekordbox doesn’t just want to be the thing you use to load up your USB stick for a CDJ, or even just another DJ app to compete with Serato and TRAKTOR and their ilk.

It also wants to run your show.

Rekordbox 6 has almost as many visual/show control improvements as music and library management additions.

The Lighting panel now has an Ambient mode and DMX Direct Control.

And there’s more:

  • Ability to add video files to audio playlists.
  • Added [All Audio] and [All Videos] in the tree view.
  • Ability to add tracks from streaming services streaming tracks to playlists.
  • Blinking interval when Strobe (Middle) is selected on the Lighting panel.
  • Added copy feature for venues and scenes in Lighting mode.
  • Added Moving Head pan/tilt limit setting and tilt reverse setting in Lighting mode.

There are actually people out there using this stuff. That’s partly for the same reason that the CDJ and DJM are so popular, which is there’s an army of Pioneer sales, support, and venue and artist relations roaming around the world to make it happen.

New pricing

You had to figure this would come at a cost. The big shift is that Rekordbox is moving to subscriptions, like so many products now.

The free version is still free – and you can unlock features with hardware, which I expect for many users will make the most sense. (You’re unlikely to use the advanced features with just a mouse and no controller, that is.)

The bad news is your old licenses don’t apply to the upgrade if you don’t have hardware that unlocks this.

The flipside is, the high-end version – with all the video and DVS – is now a better deal.

Just don’t panic – the Export mode is still in the free version, and you can actually even use performance features on PC/Mac, which means you don’t have to pay just to unlock those features when you’re away from your controller. And that’s handy – sometimes you want to try mixing two tracks together before you export them to USB.

So, free:

  • Export mode
  • Performance features controlled via PC/Mac

Core (6.99EUR-USD a month, discounted from 9.99EUR-USD regular):

  • Adds performance features
  • Adds DVS control

Creative mode ($/€9.99 a month intro, regular price to be 14.99) is where the big stuff is at, and since your hardware only unlocks “core,” you might still wind up having to pay for it:

  • Cloud Library Sync
  • Lyric feature
  • Video feature
  • Sequencer
  • RMX EFFECTS

I am not normally a fan of one player dominating the market, personally, but Rekordbox solves an extraordinary set of use cases in a way its competitors don’t even touch. And hey, the computer DJ experience it offers – which was once pretty deficient – has improved a lot.

When it comes to visual features and performance, Serato remains the functionality rival. So there’s your horse race – especially because Pioneer’s advantage of being the CDJ company is for the moment erased by the fact that there are no festivals or clubs. (Ahem.)

I’ll definitely be trying this out with some mixing soon – and will talk to some of the people working with its advanced video/show features. (They’re still working away, even in the lockdown.) Stay tuned.

Don’t miss their updated macOS info:

https://rekordbox.com/en/2020/04/important-notice-for-mac-users/

Download and more info:

https://rekordbox.com

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Control free streaming tool OBS Studio with OSC – and more essential tricks

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 7 Apr 2020 5:27 pm

Control live streaming and recording tool OBS Studio with other apps and tools, and route video live. Free add-ons make it all possible.

Keep in mind this isn’t just for the live streaming craze – it’s for recording, too. But if you’re going to stream, by all means, do something interesting.

Carlo Cattano has made a free tool with some major implications – and it’s simple enough that it’s also a nice demo of how to write this in Python, generally. This code lets you route Open Sound Control – the high-res, open communication protocol used by many VJ apps, touch apps on iOS, and other applications – into OBS Studio:

Control OBS Studio with Open Sound Control template example [https://github.com/CarloCattano/ObSC]

That opens up all sorts of possibilities – script and automate video switching, jam live with the input, automate screencasts and recording, and more.

Also useful in OBS – you can route input from other applications directly.

On the Mac, you can use Syphon, open tech that lets you route 3D textures in OpenGL as easily between apps as you might audio signal in a patch bay. That’s native in the latest OBS release.

By the way you might even go the opposite direction – using this as output to mapping, for example:

On Windows, there’s Spout2 support (the Windows DirectX 11 equivalent of Syphon):

https://github.com/Off-World-Live/obs-spout2-source-plugin

For an example of what this is for, here’s someone recording live visuals – alongside Ableton Live – using OBS and Spout. And this is from 2017, so again, it’s not just about live streaming during the pandemic.

And across platforms, you can use obs-ndi, which support’s NewTek’s NDI for networked audiovisual support:

https://github.com/Palakis/obs-ndi

That’s useful,, because it lets you freely specify sources, outputs, and filters using OBS over a network.

Streamers – and gamers in particular – have been using this already to use phones as remote cameras and perform multiple computer streaming.

You can even use it to save using a capture card:

More tips:

And yes, you could also use NDI to build your own switcher using something like TouchDesigner:

Full tutorial:

BUILD A NDI SWITCHER IN TOUCHDESIGNER 099 [mxav.net]

So there you have it. Let other people keep running horrible sound from their phone, while you use OBS as an all-purpose tool for routing, switching, capturing, and streaming video. Oh yeah and – you can use all of this to make your phone a capture, while using your computer to make light work of streaming/recording audio feeds and mic in high quality.

And the essential glue here is all free.

That means all of this streaming craze is a perfectly reasonable time for the rest of us to hone some of our video chops, whether we’re musicians or visualists. So hope you’re staying safe at home, and happily patching video switchers any time the news makes you a bit too anxious. At least … that’s part of my plan, for sure. Best to all of you and – yes, you can actually invite me to your streams.

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Here’s how to update KORG’s wireless nano controller, and use it with iOS 13 (and more)

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 24 Feb 2020 1:43 pm

In case you missed it, in November, KORG fixed issues with their portable Bluetooth MIDI controllers/keyboards and iOS 13. Wireless operation works with desktop OSes, too – and it’s really cool.

Firmware updates I know can be a bit scary, and it’s possible some owners of the KORG wireless devices didn’t even know that there was a fix (or that you can do this, for that matter)! So it’s worth sharing this video KORG posted at the end of last week.

iOS changes have kept developers scrambling lately, but at least this catches you up. And it’s tough to beat the iPad and a wireless nanoKEY as an ultra-portable rig on the road.

Wireless Bluetooth MIDI operation is a strong, low-latency solution on desktop OSes, too, though – useful if you have your computer handy and just need some input device to sketch in ideas or try our your latest virtual modular patch. (That’s me, anyway!)

KORG’s wireless controllers do support both Mac and Windows, too. (I’ll check if there’s a way to get this working on Linux; I suspect someone ported over Apple’s implementation. I also don’t see Android officially supported, but there’s some version there – or you can just use USB and an OTG cable, in a pinch.)

There are a few features that make the nanoKEY Studio easy to recommend, specifically. Everything is ultra-low-profile, so it’s more optimal for tossing in a backpack. There’s still velocity sensitivity on both the pads and keys, and back lighting for dark situations. But I think what’s especially winning is – not just knobs, but also an X/Y pad (KAOSS style), onboard arpeggiator, scale and chord mapping.

KORG push the notion that this helps when you’re not a skilled keyboardist but – obviously, even if you’ve got years of piano training, on a little controller like this you’re in a different mode.

https://www.korg.com/us/products/computergear/nanokey_studio/

Also quite useful on the go, nanoKONTROL Studio:

https://www.korg.com/us/products/computergear/nanokontrol_studio/index.php

In fact, I can imagine nanoKONTROL Studio with the new (wired) Novation Launchpad mini would be ideal. The Launchpad mini has input but not anything that works easily as a mixing layout – other than a somewhat crude mode that uses the pads for that, but doesn’t give you continuous control. Both would fit in a slim-line backpack with literally nothing else, for an easy iPad or notebook computer studio.

Or couple the Launchpad mini and nanoKONTROL Studio, because then you can lock individual controllers to particular instruments without swapping (useful!), or separate clip triggering and instrumental playing.

I just personally love being able to work when traveling and to fit live rigs into small spaces.

The post Here’s how to update KORG’s wireless nano controller, and use it with iOS 13 (and more) appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Prototypes are free, open-source plug-ins – use them for sound, or to learn Csound

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 12 Feb 2020 7:24 pm

Get a free algorithmic bass drum generator, a lo-fi modulator, a massive granular workstation, for free – and that’s just the beginning.

Micah Frank is one of the most prolific sound designer-inventor-composer types around, via his Puremagnetik soundware label and personal projects. Lately, he’s been turning some of these larger, more experimental projects into free tools that you can both use in your own music – and learn from and expand.

Last summer, we saw an expansive, unparalleled granular tool take form as both album and free code:

But now, Micah has gone further – way further. The new series is a set of plug-ins called Prototypes. That granular instrument from last summer has become what is really a full-fledged tool like no other, and now is available in plug-in form. There are new tools in a slightly more pre-release state, true to the “prototype” name. But all are ready to use – and they offer a window into the power of Csound, the fully free and open-source omni-platform sound toolkit that is descended the very first digital audio tools ever created.

Available already:

Kickblast (an algorithmic bass drum generator)

Parallel (a lo-fi modulator)

And a much developed (not so prototype-ish) plugin version of my multitrack granular workstation Grainstation C

Pre-built plug-ins for VST and Audio Unit are available for macOS and 64-bit Windows. I think it’s trivial to build for some other platforms (I need to check that out), or you can also run in Csound directly. Find those in the Builds section of his GitHub:

https://github.com/micah-frank-studio/Prototypes/tree/master/Builds

It’s all open-source (GNU GPLv2 license), and while you can run it as a plug-in, the sound code is all in Csound. Full repository:

https://github.com/micah-frank-studio/Prototypes

Micah tells CDM he hopes that some of you will discover what Csound can do in your own work. ” Csound is my favorite,” Micah says. The “spectral, granular, convolution sound” is one of the best available, he raves. “I feel like it needs an awareness push, as the music-making community is much more ready to code than they were in the ’80s. And the learning curve from Max (or even a modular system) to Csound is not so bad.”

Noted.

Follow Micah on Instagram, so you get some pretty nature shots interspersed with your music nerd goodness. My kind of influencer.

https://www.instagram.com/micah.frank.studio/

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CHORDimist is an insane Max for Live chord-generating MIDI effect

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 3 Jan 2020 7:11 pm

Chordmaker, arpeggiator on steroids, harmonic processor – CHORDimist is another of the powerful Max for Live tools for composition.

I figured yesterday’s blitz of Max for Live news would bring out something I missed. Chris Hahn pointed us to this one, by South Korean-based developer Leestrument.

It’s a chord generator, but it’s also really an advanced arpeggiator / MIDI harmonizer, with modes for firing off, sustaining, or arpeggiating harmonies. Add in lots of parameters for direction and variation – both of the chords themselves and how they’re played – and you have a sophisticated MIDI effect.

CHORDimist is US$49 and requires the latest Max for Live, meaning you want Live Suite 10.1 or greater (or an equivalent Max for Live license).

https://gumroad.com/l/chordimist

Ha, also – I love that the filename for the screenshot on Lee’s site is _E1_84_89_E1_85_B3_E1_84_8F_E1_85_B3_E1_84_85_E1_85_B5_E1_86_AB_E1_84_89_E1_85_A3_E1_86_BA_202019-10-02_20_E1_84_8B_E1_85_A9_E1_84_8C_E1_85_A5_E1_86_AB_204.13.04.png.

That’s… specific.

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Map anything in Ableton Live’s Browser to MIDI, keyboard with Max for Live

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 2 Jan 2020 10:33 pm

Get push-button access to your favorite stuff in Ableton Live with this clever Max for Live tool.

Continuing our new year look at some of the coolest Max for Live stuff, flowstate has come up with a tool that lets you map anything in Live’s Browser. If you find yourself frequently using the same instrument, effect, sample, or whatnot, you can now map those to keyboard or MIDI.

The solution is a combination of MIDI Remote Script with Max for Live Device. And it works with almost anything – devices, sounds, third-party plug-ins, basically anything except Live Packs (which don’t support this mapping).

The package is name-your-price, with a £5 minimum.

The developers says instructions and an example set are included, plus 64 button slots pre-mapped to all of the internal Live Suite stuff (MIDI Effects, Audio Effects, and Instruments), including 5 user slots (or remap the whole thing as you wish).

https://gumroad.com/l/SgohV

https://maxforlive.com/library/device/5884/browser-mapper

It’s overkill for me personally, but I imagine it could be really useful to some. And it shows some of the potential of using the Live API and MIDI Remote Scripts to customize Live, so I imagine it might inspire other ideas, too.

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FL Studio 20.6 does what FL does best – adds more great toys to play with

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 12 Dec 2019 9:37 am

It’s still tough to beat FL Studio when it comes to, well, playing with stuff – in a tool in which that play can get very advanced indeed.

There are some great new toys here:

Distructor is a new pedal-style distortion and multi-effects plug-in. What’s especially nice is you get four slots, each of which can be assigned to one of four modules. There are different distortion models and then filters, chorus, and speaker cabinets. Those different distortion models (Blood overdrive, Soft Clippor, Harmor, Distructor, and Crusher) each have their own various algorithm choices, so this thing is deep. And the filters give you every shape you would want.

This reuses some existing FL stuff, but in a very nice way, and you can mess around with all the different bits and re-route them. In fact, it occurs to me that this is really what the scattered distortion and cabinet devices in Ableton Live probably should have been. Advantage, FL on this one.

If you want to go even crazier, the amp/cab bit is based on Fruity Convolver. So you could instead of limiting yourself to Distructor alone, chase the Distructor plug-in with Fruity Convolver and then load any impulse you want for some serious mayhem.

The Euclidean Rhythm Generator lets you fill in patterns with this now weirdly ubiquitous mathematical means of generating symmetrical rhythms, which work well as polyrhythms and in techno. Right-click a channel, and choose Advanced Fill.

Control Voltage is a new Fruity Voltage Controller for integrating with analog gear. It works with any DC-coupled interface – which now includes those affordable MOTU boxes I looked at recently for a low-cost solution. (Or just use a Eurorack rig with an audio interface inside it.)

“Burn” MIDI. Got an interesting pattern coming out of the Arpeggiator, note effects, or other plug-ins? Now you can right-click the channel and record to MIDI. Yeah, this already works in DAWs like Logic Pro, but it really fits the FL workflow perfectly.

NewTime time warping. Warp, quantize, and groove shuffle audio. This is a far cry from the early days of FL Studio where everyone seemed to be making terrible trance tracks with only the default step sequencer options in the main view. FL now gives well-known, much more expensive DAWs a proper run for the money.

Oh speaking of mangling audio – the Fruity Granulizer now has a display and visualizations so you can see what you’re doing, so together with NewTime, you can mess with sound really easily.

Plus there are tons of other improvements – convert playlist tracks to audio, “don’t show this in the future” checkbox for popups, and a ton of little details. (FLEX has a modulation speed for reverb time, for instance.)

Both Image-Line and SoundCloud sent me press releases emphasizing that you can upload directly to SoundCloud from FL. I have a feeling if you have the patience to read my writing, you already know how to upload to SoundCloud, but … now you know.

More importantly, Image-Line continue their lifetime free updates tradition – think of it as the reverse of horrible subscriptions in certain pro graphics apps. The subscription model: pay continuously, see updates that you mostly don’t want. The FL Studio model: pay once, see updates you want, continuously. (You need a supported account, but it can be worth it.)

The latest – and there’s a lot of it:

FL Studio 20.6 released [Image-Line news]

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Reaper 6 is here – and even more the everyday, budget DAW to beat

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 5 Dec 2019 6:47 pm

It’s got a $60 license for nearly everyone, you can evaluate it for free, and now Reaper – yet again – adds a ton of well-implemented power features. Reaper 6 is the newest edition of this exceptionally capable DAW.

New in this release:

Use effects plug-ins right from the tracks/mixer view. So, some DAWs already have something like a little EQ that you can see in the channel strip visually, or maybe a simple compressor. Reaper has gone further, with small versions of the UI for a bunch of popular plug-ins you can embed wherever you want. That means less jumping in and out of windows while you patch.

You get EQ, filtering, compressor, and more. (ReaEQ, ReaFIR, ReaXcomp, graphical JSFX, etc.)

Powerful routing/patching. The Routing Diagram feature gives you an overview of how audio signal is routed throughout the environment, which makes sends and effects and busing and sidechaining and so on visual. It’s like having a graphical patchbay for audio right inside the DAW. (Or it’s like the ghost of the Logic Pro Environment came back and this time, average people actually wanted to use it. )

Auto-stretch audio. Now, various DAWs have attempted this – you want sound to automatically stretch and conform as you adjust tempo or make complex tempo changes. That’s useful for film scoring, for creative purposes, and just because, well, you want things to work that way. Now Reaper’s developers say they’ve made it easy to do this with tempo-mapped and live-recorded materials (Auto-stretch Timebase). This is one we’ll have to test.

Make real envelopes for MIDI. You can draw continuous shapes for your MIDI control adjustments, complete with curve adjustment. That’s a bit like what you get in Ableton Live’s clip envelopes, as well as other DAWs. But it’s a welcome addition to Reaper, which increasingly starts to share the depth of other older DAWs, without the same UI complexity (cough).

It works with high-density displays on Mac and PC. That’s Retina on Mac and the awkwardly-named HiDPI on PC. But the basic idea is, you can natively scale the default theme to 100%, 150%, and 250% on new high-def displays without squinting. Speaking of which

There’s a new tweakable theme. The new theme is set up to be customizable with Tweaker script.

Big projects and displays work better. The developers say they’ve “vastly” optimized 200+ track-count projects. On the Mac, you also get faster screen drawing with support for Apple’s Metal API. (Yeah, everyone griped about that being Mac-only and proprietary, but it seems savvy developers are just writing for it and liking it. I’m honestly unsure what the exact performance implications are of doing the same thing on Windows, though on the other hand I’m happy with how Reaper performs everywhere.)

And more. ” Dynamic Split improvements; import and render media with embedded transient information; per-track positive or negative playback offset; faster and higher quality samplerate conversion; and many other fixes and improvements.”

Honestly, I’m already won over by some of these changes, and I had been shifting conventional DAW editing work to Reaper as it was. (That is, sure, Ableton Live and Bitwig Studio and Reason and whatever else are fun for production, but sometimes you want a single DAW for editing and mixdown that is none of those others.)

Where Reaper stands out is its extraordinary budget price and its no-nonsense, dead-simple UI – when you really don’t want the DAW to be too creative, because you want to get to work. It does that, but still has the depth of functionality and customization that means you feel you’re unlikely to outgrow it. That’s not a knock on other excellent DAW choices, but those developers should seriously consider Reaper as real competition. Ask some users out there, and you’ll hear this name a lot.

Now if they just finish that “experimental” native Linux build, they’ll really win some nerd hearts.

https://www.reaper.fm

Those of you who are deeper into the tool, do let us know if you’ve got some tips to share.

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Abyss is a free doom effect for Max for Live – happy Halloween!

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Thu 31 Oct 2019 7:40 pm

Subtle, nuanced, transparent, almost inaudible sonic adjustment? No – let’s kick things into the deep, terrifying flaming pits of Hell. Meet Abyss.

So, yes, it’s Halloween. That means even if you don’t have a costume, you can make up for it by grabbing this free Max for Live device and plugging in a microphone. (Say your costume is “audio engineer.” Pretty much anything works.)

But the cats at Max for Cats have put together a wonderfully disturbing audio effect in “Abyss” that I’m sure some of us will use year-round. Their description says it:

… lets you forward any input signal into the abyss. The result is an ominous, gory and hellish version of your original input signal. Use with extreme caution and only if you have a strong, sane mind.

Sorry, what was that last bit? I tuned it out. Never mind.

What’s actually here: repitching, reverb, delay with feedback, but all mashed together in a truly wonderfully demented way. So you get precise controls for damping, tail, spread, early reflections, flanging delay feedback, modulation rate and depth, and pitch presets.

Plus included Mirror, Cat, and Crow at no additional cost.

As it’s a Max for Live device, you’ll need Ableton Live 10 or later and a Max for Live license (included in Live Suite).

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Blackhole routes audio between Mac apps, even on Catalina, as ideal Soundflower alternative

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 28 Oct 2019 1:19 am

Need to record audio from an app, or route sound from one tool to another? Blackhole is an easy, free way to do that on the Mac, right through the latest macOS Catalina.

The utility Soundflower got some brand recognition among music and audio nerds after its introduction way back in 2004, but that tool is now largely defunct. It’s based on now-deprecated Mac tools, so fine for older machines, but fairly useless for newer Macs running the latest OS. JACK audio is a powerful option across platforms, and it’s especially powerful and easy on Linux, on which platform developers are more likely to write native clients. But it was never as friendly to new users as Soundflower.

Blackhole gives you more of that sort of simplicity, with modern updates – including full support for macOS Catalina that has eluded some other tools. Basically, look to Soundflower for older OSes, and consider Blackhole for 10.10 (Yosemite) and later, especially if you’re up to Mojave or Catalina.

You get 16 channels of audio (configurable up to 256 if you need that for some reason), lots of sample rates, and – as with the other solutions mentioned here – zero latency.

It’s pretty simple stuff, and my initial tests suggest this it’s solid. I think given the pace of Apple’s updates, the actively developed Mac-specific tool here wins:

https://github.com/ExistentialAudio/BlackHole

This triggered a lively discussion after the developer mentioned it on Reddit:

By the way, it’s interesting that users expect a tool made for macOS audio architectures to work on Windows. Since most pro audio tasks rely on ASIO, you’ll want to use that architecture for inter-app audio routing.

On Windows and ASIO, for a cross-platform implementation, JACK really is your best bet. In the past, that meant some complex installation, but there’s now an easy guide:

https://jackaudio.org/faq/jack_on_windows.html

Some tools also come with their own virtual ASIO driver, like ReaRoute in Reaper:

https://wiki.cockos.com/wiki/index.php/ReaRoute

For a flexible driver that runs without requiring software to support ASIO, I recommend LoopBeAudio. It’s paid, but from a great developer who’s really focused on Windows support:

https://www.nerds.de/en/loopbeaudio.html

While you’re there, that’s also the best way to route MIDI between apps on Windows. Check out LoopBe1 – it’s good enough that I don’t even miss the native tools I use on macOS and Linux:

https://www.nerds.de/en/loopbe1.html

JACK remains the tool that works everywhere, but I do make use of these specific tools for the Mac and Windows. Let us know how Blackhole is working for you, if you’ve found an interesting use case, and if you run into trouble.

The post Blackhole routes audio between Mac apps, even on Catalina, as ideal Soundflower alternative appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

How focusing on one tool cured writers block, and made one sharp, chilly, ‘stoic’ EP

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 17 Sep 2019 5:04 pm

Tools and technology are often described as obstacles. But sometimes focusing on a tool can refine musical process and composition – as main(void) reveals.

And yes, the goal here is, as always, to cure writers’ block and finish something that you feel really happy with. Let’s first hear the finished item, as it’s got the kind of deliciously calculated, precise electronics that first drew me to Europe. It feels chilly, but still sensual – foreplay for cyborgs, you know, putting the tech in techno:

Working musicians all have to balance different gigs. An emerging role for us is working out how to take day jobs in designing tools and sound design, and use that experience to help us make our creative musical experience better.

In the case of main(void), aka Jan Ola Korte, it meant parlaying his work in 2018 designing sounds for Native Instruments’ TRK-01 into honing his music making process. He writes:

When I was working on the sound design for Native Instruments TRK-01 in 2018, I saved a few presets to use in my own music. These sounds and patterns ended up becoming the foundation of Stoicism, my first solo EP that was released Aug 21 on Spatial Cues. I had a little bit of a writer’s block situation, so I tried to resolve it by working within very restrictive parameters. All five original tracks on Stoicism use TRK-01 as the only sound source, processed through a number of effect plug-ins. Limiting myself in this way created a nicely coherent sound palette. Since I only used TRK-01’s internal sequencers, I arranged the tracks via automation in Ableton Live, which switched up my routine in an inspiring way. In the end, this workflow not only resolved the writer’s block but led to my most comprehensive release so far.

The basic idea of TRK-01 is to do just that – it puts some focused modules dedicated to dance production in a single place. There’s a kick module, bass, sequencer, and effects – but it’s not preset territory, as each module has a number of different engines. That is, the clever twist here is removing cognitive overhead (by simplifying and integrating the interface), without limiting your creative choices (since there is still a full spectrum of very different sounds you can get out of each module).

Even with that being said, you still might not be certain how to turn this into a completed track. Now, each person will find a different pathway there, but seeing how Jan works – a bit like working with a studio mate – can often give you that “ah ha, I could actually learn from this” feeling.

Jan asked if he should do a full narrated look at his working method. Answer: aber ja.

By the way, of course this also means that by keeping this focused, adapting the release to a live gig is far easier. You’ll be able to catch main(void) live at Griessmuhle, alongside some very special DJ friends like DJ Pete, Alinka, and Qzen, plus some great names, in late October in Berlin.

More music:

Site: http://www.spatialcues.com/

Oh and yeah, go grab the music on Bandcamp! This is the them problem with promo pools, I see some huge names are playing these tracks out but they got the music for free.

The post How focusing on one tool cured writers block, and made one sharp, chilly, ‘stoic’ EP appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Gory sounds from vegetables and fruits: Mortal Kombat sound design

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 28 Aug 2019 6:21 pm

VICE News did a great video piece on the sound design of the latest Mortal Kombat video game. And it could inspire you to try some experiments with a mic yourself.

“You punched my brain out of my face.” Okay, that needs some gooey, awful sounds indeed.

VICE headed to the recording facilities at Netherrealm Studios in Chicago, who worked on the game’s foley track, and spoke with Senior Sound Designer Stephen Schappler. Now, you may or may not get the chance to make your own violent game soundtrack, but the thoughts here are some added sonic inspiration to try new experiments with a mic.

The secret sauce is pretty simple: actual blunt objects and weapons, meet … juicy fruits and veg. Get those organic sounds, then repitch, process, distort, and so on. (It occurs to me that may shift the approach a bit from the more real-for-real technique of someone like Ben Burtt, whose sounds for the likes of Star Wars seemed to involve more layering and unexpected recordings, lacking some of this software. But both directions likely now hold some appeal for us today.)

Nutcracker and nuts – that’s easy. Squishing a green pepper or grapefruit – fantastic. I won’t give all the rest away.

In the box, there are still more tricks – let’s trainspot a bit here.

The DAW is Reaper, which looks like Stephen has really mastered in keyboard shortcuts. (Note also the track folders for asset management.)

You’ll also see he keeps a second display for maintaining a giant list of sound files. And there are some convenient controllers handy (a MIDI Fighter Twister, PreSonus FaderPort – actually, the Classic.)

The big trick here is mangling the samples with Twisted Tools’ S-LAYER for Reaktor 5 and later.

Fun times.

You know you’re a sound geek, though, when this makes you want to open Reaktor rather than a PlayStation.

The post Gory sounds from vegetables and fruits: Mortal Kombat sound design appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The new Renoise stretches samples, scales UIs, shapes curves, more

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 27 Aug 2019 12:53 pm

Renoise, the gorgeous, obsessive production tool that makes the tracker modern, gets a point release with some very good stuff. High res UIs, custom envelopes, native time stretching – and yeah, it’s a host and a plug-in, too.

It’s fitting somehow that Renoise 3.2 and its plug-in version come on the heels of Reason 11 and its Reason Rack Plugin. Renoise had the same idea – Redux is the plug-in version of the production tool, reimagined in this case as a self-contained instrument. That means you can drop Redux (Renoise) into Reason if you like the Reason workflow and patching. Or if you’ve ever wished you could take Reason’s excellent instruments and effects, but control them with the precision of a tracker interface, now you’ll be able to take Reason Rack Plugin instances and run it inside Renoise. Whoa.

Re re re re ….

But whether or not you get into that, Renoise is just… well, awesome. And 3.2 is a free update (alongside Redux 1.1) that adds a ton of major stuff that would probably be a full, paid, whole number version update from some other developers.

Let’s talk:

Custom GUI scaling options and full high density display support (HiDPI or what Apple calls Retina). No more blurry UIs.

Native time stretching of samples, with Rubberband in the sampler.

Detachable mixer.

Custom curves: custom exponential, per point scaling in all automation editors and the AHDSR modulation device. Because, really, trackers deserve curves now.

Audition sample editor selections with a MIDI keyboard or your computer keyboard.

In other words, you’ll now be able to work with samples and curves more fluidly, and you won’t have to squint at your display. And all of this runs in Mac, Windows, and Linux, plus 32-bit and 64-bit plugins for VST or AU (and Linux VST, too).

Full details:

https://forum.renoise.com/t/renoise-3-2-redux-1-1-released/58011

The post The new Renoise stretches samples, scales UIs, shapes curves, more appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

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