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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2012 » October » 03


Breakbot drops in on Beatport Live on Wednesday, October 10th

Delivered... Sean Lewis | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 9:00 pm
Beatport Live welcomes Ed Banger artist Breakbot for our mid-week webcast next Wednesday, October 10th. The French producer will be in our Berlin office for a funky electro-style set of tracks to break up the week. Tune in starting at 5 PM GMT/10 AM MDT.

News : LOOK: Submit Your Remix Of The Wombats’ Latest Single, “Jump Into The Fog,” To Win Insane Swag!

Delivered... info@filtermmm.com | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 8:15 pm
LOOK: Submit Your Remix Of The Wombats’ Latest Single, “Jump Into The Fog,” To Win Insane Swag!

Starting in early October and continuing through October 22Wombats fans have the chance to win some incredibly sweet swag (tickets, t-shirts, vinyl, meet-and-greets, guitar picks, custom filter V-Moda headphones, and much more). All you need to do is submit an original remix of the Liverpool indie rock trio's hit track "Jump Into the Fog": track three off of their second LP, The Wombats Proudly Present: This Modern Glitch. 

This contest is sponsored by yours truly; clearly FILTER is a big fan of these dudes, who will also be performing later this week in Los Angeles at our Culture Collide Festival. To enter, post your submission in The Wombats' SoundCloud dropbox or their WebDoc. Godspeed! (whether you're speeding up or slowing down the tempo). 

Continue reading at FILTERmagazine.com

Israel’s Perfect Stranger takes a Leap of Faith with his new triple album

Delivered... Dan Cole | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 8:00 pm
Israel-based producer Yuli Fershtat (aka Perfect Stranger) doesn’t like to be boxed in. Go to his Facebook page and the first thing you’ll read is the infamous Forrest Gump quote, "Life is like a box chocolates..." Ask him what style of music he plays and he’ll tell you that "everything" only just covers it. From psychedelic through to mini-maximal and techno, this guy does it all. This month saw his album Leap of Faith arrive on Iboga Records, and it encapsulates his raw live energy and features a series of special live edits of some his best tracks. Read on to find out more behind how he started and what various influences he’s taken.

News : LOOK: Iceland Migrates To Seattle For The Third Annual Reykjavik Calling: Sister City Showcase

Delivered... info@filtermmm.com | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 8:00 pm
LOOK: Iceland Migrates To Seattle For The Third Annual Reykjavik Calling: Sister City Showcase

That age-old, Negative Nancy phrase, "too good to be true," is just straight up wrong sometimes. Prime example: that time of year when celebrated musicians from Iceland fly out to Washington to showcase the work they have collaborated on with Seattle-based artists.

This event is dubbed Reykjavik Calling (after the capital of Iceland) and it is presented by the awesome Seattle radio station KEXP 90.3 on October 12. Did we already mention that there's absolutely no cover charge?! Yup. Too good AND totally true. The headlining acts from Iceland this year are rock quartet Sudden Weather Change, who will be performing this week at FILTER's 2012 Culture Collide Festival, indie singer/songwriter Ásgeir Trausti, and experimental five-piece, Apparat Organ Quartet.

Continue reading at FILTERmagazine.com

BBC Is Working On Streaming Music Service Called Playlister

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 7:30 pm
The Beeb wants to expand the iPlayer to include a music service.

Star Slinger makes his pleasantly unexpected OWSLA debut

Delivered... Matt Ferry | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 6:00 pm
UK beat maestro Star Slinger’s recent remix of Hundred Waters’ “Thistle” isn’t what I’ve come to expect from the OWSLA camp. Sweet, subtle side-chain, rolling 808 snares, and starry-eyed piano plinks aren’t what you’d associate with Skrilly and his coterie of WMC-mainstage madmen, but it would seem the original Hundred Waters signing was meant out [...]

Watch Spiritualized at Bestival – “Walkin With Jesus” (stream)

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 6:00 pm
Bestival is a festival curated by Rob Da Bank from BBC Radio, and it recently went down on the Isle of Wight in the UK. Spiritualized was there and turned in a performance ... they're in this video playing the song "Walkin With Jesus."

Watch Spiritualized at Bestival – “Walkin With Jesus” (stream)

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 6:00 pm
Bestival is a festival curated by Rob Da Bank from BBC Radio, and it recently went down on the Isle of Wight in the UK. Spiritualized was there and turned in a performance ... they're in this video playing the song "Walkin With Jesus."

DIY Maven: Apollo 13 is a Beautiful, Handmade Aluminum Ableton Live Controller

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 5:01 pm

Crafted from aluminum, this DIY controller puts some of the store-bought options to shame. Photo by the creator, Adam Dzak.

Years ago, when the phrase “controllerism” was still yet-to-be-coined and there was no official hardware for Ableton Live, DJ Sasha had one hell of a custom piece of kit. The Maven featured oversize, hard-to-disconnect plugs and beautiful metal hardware. Years later, it’d still make any Ableton user drool.

What’s a Live user to do? Stop drooling, and start building.

DIYer and musician Adam Dzak did just that. He created his own MIDI controller, constructed from aircraft-grade aluminum, and used Ableton Live scripting to tailor control to software. The result is something a bit like the APC40 made by Ableton and Akai, but with I think a really lovely layout and massively-nicer build quality. Adam is also blogging all of this as he goes, with the hopes of making the build details available to others who want to create the same object – or design their own.

Introducing Apollo 13
http://adamdzak.blogspot.de/

The surprise? The whole project cost just US$487 in parts. That’s not counting labor, of course, and there’s a lot of that, but even keeping parts cost that low on a one-off is a major achievement.

The parts:

$200 – pushbutton leds
$180 – the actual MIDI interface*
$20 – all faders (big and small)
$20 – a sheet of 6061 aluminum
$20 – a sheet of 16ga steel
$11 – knobs
$10 – nylon stand offs and matching screws
$10 – all resistors
$8 – various wire
$5 – perf board
$3 – all diodes

And having used various options, the winner for assembling the controller – one I think is a fine choice for this application – is Livid’s Builder. He then builds a lot from scratch.
http://lividinstruments.com/hardware_builder.php

Of course, an easier solution would be to opt instead for Livid’s modular Elements product (more on that in a bit), but that eliminates the fun of having a truly custom layout and shell.

Of course, it has to light up. Photo courtesy the artist.

By the way, here’s what I said in 2005, rather casually; this certainly turned out to be true. What’s incredible is that there wasn’t much in the way of hardware at the time; a lot of people used gear like the M-Audio Oxygen8, though, then again, that still works reasonably well. What there was was the German-built, compact Faderfox – which still remains a competitive choice today. I wrote:

[The Maven] demonstrates how adding physical control can optimize working in Live for more active remixing. That’s a huge deal for those of us improvising whole musical sets with live instruments onstage. Sasha’s first out of the gate with this expensive custom job, but with new cheaper, plastic options for us poorer folks, you can bet this is a trend that will spread fast.

Also amusing: Sasha at the time lugged around a giant iMac G5, something you don’t have to do any more.

On reflection, the biggest change is that doing this sort of custom hardware is much more inexpensive than it was in 2005, owing to lots of custom shops (both locally and in China). And it’s also vastly better-documented and more accessible, via easier-to-use hardware platforms.

I absolutely adore this quote from Mythbusters’ Adam Savage, at the end:

“…maybe then I’ll achieve the end of this exercise, but really if we’re all going to be honest with ourselves I have to admit that achieving the end of the exercise was never the point of the exercise to begin with was it?”
- Adam Savage

Amen, brother.

Let us know if you get inspired by (the other) Adam’s work to try your own exercise in DIY controllers.

DIY Maven: Apollo 13 is a Beautiful, Handmade Aluminum Ableton Live Controller

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 5:01 pm

Crafted from aluminum, this DIY controller puts some of the store-bought options to shame. Photo by the creator, Adam Dzak.

Years ago, when the phrase “controllerism” was still yet-to-be-coined and there was no official hardware for Ableton Live, DJ Sasha had one hell of a custom piece of kit. The Maven featured oversize, hard-to-disconnect plugs and beautiful metal hardware. Years later, it’d still make any Ableton user drool.

What’s a Live user to do? Stop drooling, and start building.

DIYer and musician Adam Dzak did just that. He created his own MIDI controller, constructed from aircraft-grade aluminum, and used Ableton Live scripting to tailor control to software. The result is something a bit like the APC40 made by Ableton and Akai, but with I think a really lovely layout and massively-nicer build quality. Adam is also blogging all of this as he goes, with the hopes of making the build details available to others who want to create the same object – or design their own.

Introducing Apollo 13
http://adamdzak.blogspot.de/

The surprise? The whole project cost just US$487 in parts. That’s not counting labor, of course, and there’s a lot of that, but even keeping parts cost that low on a one-off is a major achievement.

The parts:

$200 – pushbutton leds
$180 – the actual MIDI interface*
$20 – all faders (big and small)
$20 – a sheet of 6061 aluminum
$20 – a sheet of 16ga steel
$11 – knobs
$10 – nylon stand offs and matching screws
$10 – all resistors
$8 – various wire
$5 – perf board
$3 – all diodes

And having used various options, the winner for assembling the controller – one I think is a fine choice for this application – is Livid’s Builder. He then builds a lot from scratch.
http://lividinstruments.com/hardware_builder.php

Of course, an easier solution would be to opt instead for Livid’s modular Elements product (more on that in a bit), but that eliminates the fun of having a truly custom layout and shell.

Of course, it has to light up. Photo courtesy the artist.

By the way, here’s what I said in 2005, rather casually; this certainly turned out to be true. What’s incredible is that there wasn’t much in the way of hardware at the time; a lot of people used gear like the M-Audio Oxygen8, though, then again, that still works reasonably well. What there was was the German-built, compact Faderfox – which still remains a competitive choice today. I wrote:

[The Maven] demonstrates how adding physical control can optimize working in Live for more active remixing. That’s a huge deal for those of us improvising whole musical sets with live instruments onstage. Sasha’s first out of the gate with this expensive custom job, but with new cheaper, plastic options for us poorer folks, you can bet this is a trend that will spread fast.

Also amusing: Sasha at the time lugged around a giant iMac G5, something you don’t have to do any more.

On reflection, the biggest change is that doing this sort of custom hardware is much more inexpensive than it was in 2005, owing to lots of custom shops (both locally and in China). And it’s also vastly better-documented and more accessible, via easier-to-use hardware platforms.

I absolutely adore this quote from Mythbusters’ Adam Savage, at the end:

“…maybe then I’ll achieve the end of this exercise, but really if we’re all going to be honest with ourselves I have to admit that achieving the end of the exercise was never the point of the exercise to begin with was it?”
- Adam Savage

Amen, brother.

Let us know if you get inspired by (the other) Adam’s work to try your own exercise in DIY controllers.

News : FILTER & Peter Gabriel Announce “So” Winning Cover By The Lighthouse And The Whaler

Delivered... info@filtermmm.com | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 5:00 pm
FILTER & Peter Gabriel Announce “So” Winning Cover By The Lighthouse And The Whaler

Celebrating the 25th anniversary of Peter Gabriel’s legendary album So and 10 years in print for FILTER, the musician and the magazine teamed up earlier this year offering the artists playing FILTER’s 2012 Culture Collide festival an unprecedented opportunity, to pay homage to a legend by covering their favorite track from So, for Peter Gabriel to listen to and judge with the winning track to be premiered on PeterGabriel.com.

Both domestic and international bands slotted to play Culture Collide 2012 submitted their own versions of Gabriel tune and we are pleased to announce that The Lighthouse and the Whaler's rendition of "That Voice Again" as the grand prize winner. Their cover of "That Voice Again" premieres today at Petergabriel.com.

Continue reading at FILTERmagazine.com

All-Foley Music Video with No Music, Kind of an Improvement [Watch, Freesound]

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 4:59 pm

Think we live in a “visual” culture? Maybe not so much – watch what happens, or, rather, listen to what happens if you remove the music from a music video. Foley, that ingredient in filmmaking that winds up being as important as light, is essential. And the results are oddly compelling, perhaps more so without the music video.

YouTuber Moto2h promises more of these, but the first iteration takes on South Korean wrapper PSY and his “Gangnam Style” single. (Full disclosure: I somehow missed that this was one of the most popular music videos of all time, inspiring even a parody by the North Korean government. Bizarre.)

It’s doubly worth mentioning here, though, as it reveals another side of remix culture – the sound samples here come from sources that include Freesound, including the footsteps of our friend Rutger Muller, who kindly sends this our way.

Listen to Dan Deacon – "Crash Jam" (stream)

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 4:30 pm
Check out crazy new sounds from Dan Deacon with the song "Crash Jam" off of his new album America. Wild keyboard undulations meet a steady pounding rhythm and a chorus of background vocals.

RA Horizons in action

Delivered... RA - The Feed | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 4:05 pm
Watch a 10-minute video of RA Horizons' Vancouver edition, featuring clips of Martyn, Gingy & Bordello and Max Ulis DJing, all shot by Open Studios owner and visual artist Ben Reeder.

Zedd drops his “Stache” video, EDC rakes it in, Robert Hood and John Tejada talk techno legacies, and DJ Izoh takes DMC

Delivered... Ken Taylor | Scene | Wed 3 Oct 2012 3:00 pm
There's a whole lot of videos to get to today, from Zedd's new "Stache" clip to a short Thomas Gold doc to some mind-melting footage of DMC champ DJ Izoh letting loose on the 1s and 2s. So without further ado, let's check out the news!
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