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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2012 » October » 30


Watch The Antlers – “Drift Dive” (video)

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 9:45 pm
Crazy timing for sure ...

EMI’s huge Electrospective campaign kicks off with some classic dance-music exclusives, including Masters At Work’s remix of Daft Punk’s "Around the World"

Delivered... Ken Taylor | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 9:00 pm
We're not gonna end the day by telling you young whippersnappers a "when I was your age" tale, but some of us olds on the Beatport staff (that's pretty much anyone over 30, if you're counting) remember with vivid detail the first time we heard Daft Punk's now-classic "Around the World" track back in 1997—and damn, it was a joyous occasion. So suffice it to say that dudes like myself are pretty stoked (do you kids say "dudes" or "stoked" anymore?) that the tracks that first turned our ears toward electronic music have, as of today, been given a huge new push from EMI's Mixed Repertoire label in the form of some amazing lost remixes from the vaults. First up, for me personally, is that iconic Daft Punk track remixed by none other than the equally legendary Masters At Work.

EMI’s huge Electrospective campaign kicks off with some classic dance-music exclusives, including Masters At Work’s remix of Daft Punk’s "Around the World"

Delivered... Ken Taylor | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 9:00 pm
We're not gonna end the day by telling you young whippersnappers a "when I was your age" tale, but some of us olds on the Beatport staff (that's pretty much anyone over 30, if you're counting) remember with vivid detail the first time we heard Daft Punk's now-classic "Around the World" track back in 1997—and damn, it was a joyous occasion. So suffice it to say that dudes like myself are pretty stoked (do you kids say "dudes" or "stoked" anymore?) that the tracks that first turned our ears toward electronic music have, as of today, been given a huge new push from EMI's Mixed Repertoire label in the form of some amazing lost remixes from the vaults. First up, for me personally, is that iconic Daft Punk track remixed by none other than the equally legendary Masters At Work.

Looking beyond EDM

Delivered... RA - The Feed | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 9:00 pm
NPR considers EDM and what makes it different from other dance music genres, talking to RA contributor Philip Sherburne and looking at Richie Hawtin's new CNTRL series.

Beatport Live welcomes DJ Dan this Friday, November 2nd

Delivered... Ross Jackson | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 8:00 pm
This Friday, we present DJ Dan live from the Beatport Denver office! The Los Angeles-based producer/DJ is a true legend, record enthusiast and house innovator, having perfected his craft for over two decades now. This devotion to the scene has not gone unnoticed and labels such as Guesthouse Music, Hotfingers, and Mute Music snapped him up to present us with his fine tunes, many of which can be heard on his brand-new album out this week, Disko-Funk Odyssey.

Beatport Live welcomes DJ Dan this Friday, November 2nd

Delivered... Ross Jackson | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 8:00 pm
This Friday, we present DJ Dan live from the Beatport Denver office! The Los Angeles-based producer/DJ is a true legend, record enthusiast and house innovator, having perfected his craft for over two decades now. This devotion to the scene has not gone unnoticed and labels such as Guesthouse Music, Hotfingers, and Mute Music snapped him up to present us with his fine tunes, many of which can be heard on his brand-new album out this week, Disko-Funk Odyssey.

Schweizer Verschwörung

Delivered... Michael Spahr | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 7:08 pm

Unter dem Projektnamen «Swiss Conspiracy» haben sich Moses Iten (Cumbia Cosmonauts, Melbourne) und Christoph Müller (Gotan Project, Paris) zusammengefunden, um alpine Klänge und lateinamerikanische Cumbia miteinander zu verkuppeln. Die EP Delire Nostalgique erscheint erst im Frühjahr 2013, doch für Norient geben die beiden im Skype-Interview erste Einblicke in ihr Work-in-Progress.

Noch vor nicht all zu langer Zeit war die Schweiz ein bettelarmes Land. Viele Schweizerinnen und Schweizer taten vor hundert Jahren das, was heute viele Menschen aus den Ländern des Südens tun: Sie suchten ihr Glück in der Ferne. Sie gingen als Wirtschaftsflüchtlinge nach Nord- und Südamerika oder nach Australien. Selbstverständlich brachten sie ihre Kultur mit – und hielten oft noch daran fest. Inzwischen hat sich aber auch die Schweizer Kultur in ihrer neuen Heimat integriert. Zum Beispiel in der lokalen Musik. Michael Spahr hat mit zwei Schweizer Musikern im Exil gesprochen. Beide wohnen seit zwanzig Jahren im Ausland. Beide interessieren sich für lateinamerikanische Musik. Und beide verarbeiten in ihrem neuen gemeinsamen Projekt ihre musikalischen Wurzeln.

Beitrag von Radio Bern RaBe [4:04']

Längeres Interview aus der Norient-Sendung Sonic Traces [14']

Playlist:

- Dialog aus dem Film Swiss Conspiracy
- Preview-Ausschnitt aus dem Track «Cumbia Alpina»
- Preview-Ausschnitt aus dem Track «Carneval do Brasil»
- neues Album der Cumbia Cosmonauts Tropical Bass Station (Chusma Records): «Colombia»
- Ausschnitt Touch el Arab «Muhammar»
- Preview-Ausschnitt aus dem Track «Delire Nostalgique»

Die ganze Sonic Traces-Sendung vom 29.10. hier hören.

Siehe auch Norient-Artikel Moses in Switzerland

Staff picks from Hot Natured, JETS, Amit, Matt Fear, Kendrick Lamar, and more

Delivered... Ken Taylor | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 7:00 pm
Kendrick Lamar's much-awaited LP leads off today's On Rotation segment, which compiles our expert team of merchandisers’ and editors’ favorite picks of the week.

News : LOOK: Brixton Gets Cozy With Their 2012 Holiday Line

Delivered... info@filtermmm.com | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 6:40 pm
LOOK: Brixton Gets Cozy With Their 2012 Holiday Line

The seasons are a-changing and with it come the Holiday lines of apparel companies around the world. FILTER friends Brixton are included in that bunch.

The Southern California company has returned with another line of timeless apparel and headware for their 2012 Holiday collection which includes twill pants, chinos, jackets, wovens, knits and of course, tons of hats for men and women!


Continue reading at FILTERmagazine.com

Pinch aims to bring the bass from Bristol to Berlin at Fly BerMuDa

Delivered... Dan Cole | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 6:00 pm
As we lead up to this weekend’s Fly BerMuDa festival at Berlin’s legendary Tempelhof airport, we continue our series of interviews with those artists performing at the event's Beatport stage. Today we catch up with Tectonic chief and dubstep don Pinch to find out more about his forthcoming project with dub maestro Adrian Sherwood and his rarities compilation.

Watch Bob Mould on Conan O’Brien – “Keep Believing” (video)

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 5:30 pm
Bob Mould played Conan O'Brien last night to perform hardcore on the song 'Keep Believing,' off of his new album Silver Age. Check out Conan when the song is over, he tells Bob to 'Try harder next time!' Bob Mould never goes part way, or all the way, he goes beyond.

Watch the video for Zombie Nation’s new single

Delivered... RA - The Feed | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 5:03 pm
The man behind big room hits like "Kernkraft 400" goes outsider house on "Attic Sundays," the first single from his upcoming LP on Turbo.

REVIEW: Bon Iver / Anais Mitchell @ Brewery Ommegang

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 5:00 pm
It was very commanding yet welcoming, a thrilling example of performers at the top of their game, grateful for their success and inclusive of their audience while still evolving.

Eno streams new album in full, Legowelt gives away his Mono/Poly sample pack, Loefah launches a new label, and Nardwuar strikes again

Delivered... Ken Taylor | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 4:00 pm
There's a lot of free stuff in today's Morning Roundup: A free Eno album, a free Legowelt sample kit, a free Azari & III podcast... but we urge you to exercise some restraint and first spend some time with punk-rock interview king (or court jester?) Nardwuar's latest assault—his Flying Lotus chat one for the ages.

Reinventing the Wheel: Engineering arc2, Digital Instrument from monome Creator [Gallery, Interview]

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Tue 30 Oct 2012 3:34 pm

Engineering a production instrument is a kind of study in compromise. For mass-produced musical instruments, it’s a fusion of practicality and economics, made affordable by a mass-market supply chain.

What makes the monome creations special isn’t just that they look beautiful; the art isn’t aesthetic only. They are uncommonly uncompromising. They’re designed in such a way that tells a story about materials, one that weaves connections between suppliers – many of them local suppliers – and focuses the experience of the device on the interface. They have the kind of obsessive attention to detail associated with the finest acoustic musical instruments, but they demonstrate digital design can be similarly exacting.

They don’t just add more. Some controllers are expensive just because they have a ridiculous number of knobs and switches, for instance; these are passionately minimal. But they reach a level of total commitment in design.

The beauty you’ll see, but understanding why it’s musically important to have this interface or just why these devices are costly can take more investigation. So, here, we get to look closer behind the scenes with the designer.

The second-generation arc, a controller built around lit encoders encased in glass, metal, and wood, reaches a whole new level of uncompromising design. It might, you could argue, be too much. These are just a set of round encoders, no more; even a previous button-press mechanism is gone, so you instead have either two or four continuous controllers with light feedback. The edition was limited to 50, and sold out as I was preparing this article. But, on the other hand, think about the simplicity of the mechanism of a piano key. It’s “just” a lever. Execution makes it into the instrument we know and love.

And here, execution cuts absolutely no corners. From monome’s self-described specifications – the latest episode in the arc saga we first covered with Brian at the beginning of 2011:

higher resolution: 1024 ticks per revolution. incredibly precise gestural capturing.
custom engineered shaft and bushing, produced by an american scientific instrumentation company. very tight tolerances. no wobble, perfect smoothness.
etched steel light shaper. acid-etched glass. sixty four crisp variable-brightness LEDs per encoder.
low profile walnut enclosure, exposed aluminum sides matching the 2012 edition grids. recessed rubber feet.
there is one change that’s important to note however—encoders no longer support a keypress. this was a long-discussed design compromise and while we appreciate the capabilities of the original edition, we’re very excited for this new incarnation. further discussion on the forum.

Pricing ran (past tense, since they’ve sold out) at $500-800 depending on number of encoders, with additional costs for shipping.

A nice window into what it means to have local suppliers and collaborate with someone like a glass cutter is this message from Brian Crabtree, posted to the monome forums. In this case, their unique supply chain both creates – and simultaneously solves – the problem.

The walnut enclosures are nearly done being finished, they look wonderful.

the fancy bushings and encoder shafts are here in bulk and feel better than we ever hoped.

somehow our circuit assembler mixed up a reel of orange LEDs from 2011 with our 2012 yellow variety. luckily only a dozen or so (i think) are the wrong color. we do order overage and hope these won’t interfere with the last few orders. will have a full inventory soon once i flash firmwares onto 300 boards.

our glass cutter (yes, real glass, water cut) switched suppliers from sandblasted to acid-etched glass. these just arrived and the thickness of the glass is not to specification, hence won’t fit our assembly. the good news is that our supplier took back the parts immediately and is re-grinding them to thickness. hopefully they’ll be back here soon, as it’s holding up production. but the fact that the parts will be turned around quickly after showing up wrong is one of the big advantages of using a local supplier.

as usual our machine shop is behind schedule, but we expect to see shipments arriving within a week.

this is all to say that we regret we’ll miss our oct 12 goal to begin shipping. i’ll post updates here and i very much appreciate your patience and understanding.

in other news i’ve just about completed a big summer project– building out a proper workshop in the barn where all of monome will be moved completely. it’s fully insulated though it’s about to be winter-tested. this edition of the arc may be the first monome edition in six years that hasn’t taken over our dining table at some point.

http://post.monome.org/comments.php?DiscussionID=15264

Tomorrow, November 1, was the expected ship date, though I imagine that will be slightly delayed by Tropical Storm Sandy. As those units start arriving in the hands of arc artists, I wanted to step back and talk to monome’s Brian Crabtree about what makes this creation special. And there’s nowhere better to start than asking about just why people need this sort of encoder expression, musically speaking, in the first place.

CDM: What are some of the works that for you were most compelling on the first arc, in terms of applications?

Rodrigo Constanzo’s Party Van:

Rodrigo’s approach is precisely the approach I imagined using the device myself. The grid allows fast-access manipulation and exploration, the arc for fine-tuning. The arc’s ability to show clear visual feedback follows the same decoupled input/output paradigm introduced with the original monome grid controllers, but with continuous control rather than discrete events.

Matthew Davidson’s Electric Dharma Wheels:

holocene from stretta on Vimeo.

Stretta is one of the few people to share a truly successful arc-only software instrument. It’s a joy to use and sounds outstanding. The high resolution of the arc is particularly well-suited for manipulation of the FM synth he’s created.

I often have to remind myself that there are only 100 units of each size arc (two and four) out in the world. The uses for the device are subtle, and I expect more surprises to emerge with time.

Can you describe the engineering goals of arc two? What was the experience like designing this stuff yourself from scratch? It clearly goes well beyond what a lot of us (my own projects included) do, in that we tend to work more with off-the-shelf components.

The primary component with the arc is a very high-quality encoder; the feel of the device is very important given its hyper-minimalism. We felt we could improve on the original by not using an OEM component and, as a result, began delving into unfamiliar engineering territory.

An optical encoder has no electrical contacts– it’s a code wheel attached to a rotating shaft which is read by a reflected LED. There’s no noise, even at incredible resolutions. We sourced higher-resolution discs and designed a circuit board with some strict mechanical parameters.

We didn’t want any play in the knob, which meant we had to design a shaft and bushing pair with much better tolerances than those typical of machine shops — we ended up using a precision scientific instrumentation company in New Jersey. After a few more technical discoveries, we’re very satisfied with the results.

We’re again using cut glass. We discovered another company which acid-etches sheet steel, which we used for shaping the LED rings. The walnut is still from Pennsylvania, and the overall design matches our recent edition of grids.

The entire process turned out not to be so financially reasonable. I don’t expect to make a lot of these devices (we’re made just 50 of each this time around), but I feel a very strong commitment to making the best work we can manage.

Massive amounts of custom engineering go into arc2 – astounding for an independent designer – from local wood cases to custom glass, metal, and electronics that enable the original high-resolution encoder. Photos courtesy monome for CDM.

I’ve spent some time talking to [serialosc engineer] William Light about this – can you share a bit of what you’ve done making OSC [OpenSoundControl] find and work with multiple devices?

Our main progress over the last years has been dealing with OSC discovery. [Ed.: this is the process of how to find devices communicating over OSC automatically, rather than having to key in IP addresses manually and the like. It's important that it work with multiple devices, as someone might use a monome and an arc, or a couple of monomes.]

Initially we found a lot of promise in [zero-configuration / auto-discovery protocol] zeroconf/[Apple] Bonjour given it’s built-in to Mac and Linux. Windows gave us a lot of trouble: it works, but any number of setups can interfere with its operation, and tracking down these tiny problems can be tricky. The other major issue is that most audio-visual environments just barely adopted OSC; zeroconf is probably asking too much. we adapted a Max/MSP external that works well, but that’s the only option outside traditional programming languages like C or Python. Furthermore, zeroconf has no official support in the OSC spec and developer community.

A way around this was to have serialosc (our device-OSC router) spawn its own information server, a port where messages can be exchanged to query the current setup. It works in place of zeroconf (though zeroconf is still built in), where an application can subscribe to future updates in device configuration changes, for example.

I see this as a first experiment in friendlier auto-routing of OSC data. Even for non-device-centric OSC data, it’s an interesting model for parameter auto-discovery and cross-application awareness. Of course, we haven’t created a standard, so there’s not something to directly hook into, but the ideas are there to explore. We’re excited to see where it goes from here.

So, anticipating the question of people impressed by arc, when might we see another edition?

As with all of our editions, we determine demand as we go. If enough people are seeking these devices, we’ll certainly make more.

monome.org

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