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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » 2017 » January » 09


Raindrops inspire mesmerizing video by Max Cooper, Maxime Causeret

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 11:18 pm

It’s good to be Max Cooper. The artist’s richly crafted sound designs are paired now with a series of music videos commissioned by motion designers. And the most mesmerizing of these is the stunning creation by Maxime Causeret.

Driven by the organic sounds of recorded rain, spun into percussion, Causeret’s animations follow emergent systems of colored particles as they merge and swim across the screen.

I could say more, but … Max sort of says it all. Here:

I’m really excited about this video project, after the first live show it was the part that everyone was asking about – It is a beautiful humanised exploration of life and emergence, by Maxime Causeret. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do!
The idea for this part of the story started on a day when there was really heavy rain hitting the roof window at my old flat. I got out my binaural mics and put my head right up by the window with the big raindrops hitting all around. They made nice individual percussive noises, with great spatial positioning, so I decided to use them to seed a piece of music.
This track is the most explicit representation of the idea of emergence in the album, because the rhythm of the track is created by the raindrops in an emergent manner – I took the audio samples, mapped the transients for the raindrop hits, and then forced the mapped points towards the nearest drumming grid positions. This meant that the random raindrops were pushed into a quantised grid, and the result was that a percussive rhythm emerged, one that I hadn’t created myself, but was the closest rhythm to that particular section of rain.
I then played the sansula over this rain rhythm, and added lots of pads and saturation layers, finally with some vocal snippets from Kathrin deBoer to complete the track. Maxime Causeret selected this track to work with, under the brief to map the emergent rhythm to an exploration of emergence in living form.
His video shows the raindrops initially, then going into simple cellular forms and then showing the important idea of cooperation between simple cells to form more robust colonies of life. This develops into a visualisation of the idea of endosymbiosis, where simpler smaller organisms can live inside larger cells, each providing a benefit to the other, and eventually forming parts of the same organism as they evolve to be entirely dependent on each other. The video also shows competition between organisms for resources, which spurs on their evolutionary development, as each species tries to keep up with the innovations of the others. He also visualises the emergent ideas of flocking behaviour, where groups of individuals form beautiful dancing-like patterns.
Maxime also shows us a section of animated reaction-diffusion patterns, where simple chemical feedback mechanisms can yield complex flowing bands of colour – these forms of system were originally thought up by Alan Turing, and were part of the early seeds of the field of systems biology, which seeks to simulate life with computers, in order to better understand the systems producing the complexity we see in the living world. They were also the starting point of my main research area many years ago before I got lost in music! (where I began with the question of what patterns could be produced via reaction-diffusion forms of system as opposed to gene-regulatory network controlled patterning).
So it’s a rich visual treat from Maxime on many levels, I can see why so many people were asking about it after the first live show. Lots more amazing video content to come over the next few weeks.
Some words from Maxime about his process (translated from French):
Max wrote a brief text on each song to let us know his own feeling and we were free to make our own creation. I firstly made a lot of small experiments with dynamic systems around my main idea of living micro organism. It was now time to experiment with editing. I also ask for opinions, ideas and tests of few friends, specially Leslie Murard.
I firstly made a lot of small experiments with dynamic systems around my main idea of living micro organism. It was hard to then put everything together. It was now time to experiment with editing. I also ask for opinions, ideas and tests of few friends, specially Leslie Murard. Then i just have to do the real shots from my experiments.
In terms of tools, I work with Houdini. It’s a software which gives you a lot of freedom. You can easily customize tools or build your own tools. It’s famous for vfx but you have the same freedom with modelling or animation tools for cheap when you’re a freelance.
I always start with few sketches on paper for ideas. I also search for références drawings/photos/painting. In Houdini i try to setup something fast to Cook or at least fast to preview in order to animate the shots in good conditions.
The major challenge was to put everything together. There’s nothing very hard but it’s never easy to get something who “works” so it needed time to adjust things. This production was made this summer on 4 months but not at full time. I also had few other projects.
You can listen to the full album here: MaxCooper.lnk.to/Emergence
Subscribe for more here: MaxCooper.lnk.to/Subscribe
And more stuff at:
maxcooper.net
facebook.com/maxcoopermax
twitter.com/maxcoopermax
soundcloud.com/max-cooper
Maxime’s pages:
teresuac.fr/
vimeo.com/user5429327

I think it’s one of the most compelling soundscapes we’ve heard from Max yet — and those links will send you down lovely trails of more inspiring visuals and sound. Enjoy!

The post Raindrops inspire mesmerizing video by Max Cooper, Maxime Causeret appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Allen & Heath Unveils Compact dLive C Class Digital Mixers

Delivered... Emusician RSS Feed | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 10:09 pm
The new C Class range will make its Debut at the NAMM Show 2017

THE PANORAMA FESTIVAL 2017 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 9:00 pm
Nine Inch Nails, Frank Ocean, Tame Impala, A Tribe Called Red, alt-J, Solange, Justice, Nick Murphy, MGMT and Spoon all headline!

Roland Announces Go:Mixer- Audio Mixer for Smartphones

Delivered... Emusician RSS Feed | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 8:18 pm
Perform, Mix Audio, and Record Video with Your Smartphone—All at Once

Antelope Audio Announces Pro Tools HD compatible interface with Orion32 HD

Delivered... Emusician RSS Feed | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 7:17 pm
Latest Addition to the Orion Family of Interfaces Features 64 Channels of Audio via HDX and USB3

A Broadcasters Calendar of Regulatory Obligation for 2017

Delivered... David Oxenford | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 6:12 pm

At the beginning of each year, we publish our broadcaster’s calendar of important dates – setting out the many dates for which broadcasters should be on alert as this year progresses.  The Broadcasters Calendar for 2017 is available here.  The dates set out on the calendar include FCC filing deadlines and dates by which the FCC requires that certain documents be added to a station’s public file.  These dates just recently changed for noncommercial broadcasters as the FCC suspended its requirement that noncommercial stations file Biennial Ownership reports every other anniversary of their license renewal filing (see our post here). Instead, their reports will be due on December 1 deadline which is the deadline for all stations, both commercial and noncommercial, to file these Biennial reports. That deadline is included on this calendar. In some states there are political windows even in what seemingly is an off year for elections (two governors and several big-city mayoral races are particularly noteworthy). The date for the beginning of the lowest unit rate window for the November general election is on the calendar, but stations need to check locally for primary dates and for any special elections that may be held in their service areas. Also included are some copyright deadlines, including dates to make payments to SoundExchange for Internet streaming royalties.

While the dates on this calendar may change, and new ones may be added, this at least gives you a start in planning your regulatory obligations. And, remember, you should always talk to your own attorney to make sure what dates are important to you.

The new MPCs in videos, including how those new clips work

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Clips,Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 6:03 pm

Following Akai’s announcement of the new standalone MPC models – MPC X and MPC Live – they’ve also released some videos.

Sound on Sound has a walkthrough:

And there’s the requisite promo film from Akai:

It’s important to note that adding standalone mode here doesn’t mean taking away anything from the computer/hardware combo. The software on the standalone MPCs is identical to what was previously available via the controller — even besting it, thanks to the MPC 2.0 software launch. Plugged into your computer, you get all the advantages you’re used to. You can add plug-ins, control MIDI on the device over USB, and drag and drop materials back to your DAW. But untethered, you can work without a computer – which also means less complexity and stability hassles in live setups.

People evidently thought I was suggesting tossing your laptop in a bin. Far from it: I think the real story here is that your computer does what it’s best at (like hosting plug-ins, handling arrangement duties, and showing things on a big display), while avoiding the situation where it can become awkward (certain live setups, or on the go, or when you want to focus on a music workflow without distractions).

The other interesting story here is the new approach to clip launching in the MPC 2.0 software. Despite the comparisons to Ableton Live, it’d be a stretch to imagine this as a real Ableton alternative – Ableton Live’s software is a complete DAW built around the clip model.

That said, I can imagine a big use case of people who have gotten used to pattern launching because Ableton is their main DAW, finding this comfortable when they’re playing onstage.

Frankly, there are also plenty of producers and DJs I know who avoid live sets because they haven’t had a rig they felt comfortable with. Setting up Ableton as their live gig tool might be daunting.

Reaching another use case, there are MPC users who are comfortable with that tool for production, and even are happy to use it for end-to-end track creation. Those folks are likely to be excited about the ability to use Audio Tracks. Now, if you do all your vocals and arrangement in Cubase, I don’t know that this is really for you. But for the drum machine-focused workflow, where someone just wants to add some vocals and do all the rest of their song writing on the MPC, this could fit.

For their part, Native Instruments are also adjusting their approach to arrangement workflows on Maschine; I’ll cover that in a separate story.

Akai are also meeting artists in a series called “standalone challenge” – one clearly geared at the US market, with some Grammy-winning legends:

The post The new MPCs in videos, including how those new clips work appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

THE SHAKY BEATS MUSIC FESTIVAL 2017 LINEUP IS OUT!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 6:00 pm
The Chainsmokers, Kaskade, GRiZ, Flosstradamus, ZEDS DEAD, Galantis, RL Grime, Alison Wonderland and Gramatik all lead the lineup! Tickets are on sale now!

U2 IS HEADLINING THE BONNAROO 2017 LINEUP!

Delivered... Spacelab - Independent Music and Media | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 6:00 pm
U2 will perform The Joshua Tree in full at Bonnaroo this year! It's the 30th anniversary of the release. The rest of the Bonnaroo lineup comes out this Wednesday, Jan. 11!

Function Loops Announce the Release of Total EDM 2017 and Lazer Pop for Spire

Delivered... Emusician RSS Feed | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 3:54 pm
Two new Collections of Samples, Presets and MIDI's

Akai’s standalone MPCs just leaked – and they could replace your laptop

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 1:15 pm

Welcome to the post-PC drum machine age. After years of leaving fans of standalone MPCs in the cold, Akai have unveiled machines that promise the flexibility of computer software – minus the computer.

And somehow all the specs and photos are on the Sweetwater website (doh!), so let’s copy-paste here. (For once, I’m glad not to be under an NDA.)

The MPC Live is probably the one you want, in a compact form factor and with a not-insane US$1,199 street price. And it’s no slouch:

mpclive-large

7″ touch screen
16 pads (hopefully these are these build on the quality of those on the previous MPC Renaissance flagship)
Weight: 2.5 kg (5.5 lbs)
Rechargeable battery (clever, that!)
16 GB of internal storage, plus external hard drive support
MPC 2.0 software has upgraded time warp and audio track recording (also putting it ahead of Maschine for DAW-like tasks)
Audio inputs: 2x 1/4″ plus 1 stereo RCA (and GND for connecting a turntable)
Audio outputs: 2x 1/4″ master, an additional 4×1/4″, plus the minijack headphone
MIDI I/O – 2 in, 2 out (that’s surprising on a small unit)
SD card
USB: 2x type A (for storage, presumably), 1x type B (for computer)
2.5″ SATA drive connector

Even the mid-range MPC Live has a surprisingly generous complement of I/O.

Even the mid-range MPC Live has a surprisingly generous complement of I/O.

We’ve already seen reasonably clever MPC software in the computer-tethered products. Now, the touchscreens on previous Akai products haven’t been the best ever, in my experience – though the bar is set high when you’re used to things like Apple’s superb iPad screens. But it absolutely beats menu diving – compare, for instance, the experience of using Pioneer’s new sample hardware. And perhaps they’ve upgraded the touchscreen component; that’ll be interesting to see.

The audio track thing to me is huge, as it vastly increases the range of what you can do with just the MPC. I suspect for a lot of producers, that’s enough to finish tracks (even if they move back to the computer for mixing and mastering).

It seems that basically what you’re getting is the MPC Touch with the software running internally on an embedded system – and some significant upgrade to I/O and better software. But given the MPC Touch was already pretty darn good, this could move the MPC Live into must-buy territory.

Of course, if you want something bigger and more powerful / own a car to carry it around or want to leave something in the studio, there’s the US$$2,199 MPC X.

It’s got everything the MPC Live has, with a bigger form factor, a bigger screen, more dedicated controls, and more I/O.

The big'n.

The big’n.

So you get:
10.1″ multi-touch screen
CV/gate for analog connectivity – 8 of them! (seems it’s output only)
Audio inputs 3/4 are both jack and RCA a
8 outputs instead of 6
4 MIDI outputs instead of 2

Another sign that this is power over portability – there’s no mention of battery power.

A big, articulated screen, extra hands-on control, and loads of I/O are what you get on the MPC X, in exchange for being a bit less mobile and paying over two grand.

A big, articulated screen, extra hands-on control, and loads of I/O are what you get on the MPC X, in exchange for being a bit less mobile and paying over two grand.

The leaked specs don’t yet have weight, but then, you’re not really buying this one for portability.

That’s all very cool, and it should be big in the American market where larger equipment is more desirable. But worldwide, the MPC Live is already powerful enough that it seems it’ll be the winner.

Who should be a little nervous? All the competition, clearly.

It’s hard not to feel Native Instruments have missed a major opportunity here. I can’t imagine anyone buying the flagship Maschine Studio when it lacks so much connectivity, let alone the need for tethering to a computer, especially with a standalone MPC Live hitting this price point. And ironically, while NI have through their history pioneered the use of native software, they could have taken that same native software and made it run standalone. They certainly could have shipped a Maschine that looked like this – and I would have been one of the first to buy it. But even as a devoted Maschine fan, I’m going to wonder about whether I really want to play live with a laptop when I could ditch it for an MPC with similar capabilities. The same is true of the Traktor line – there really is some truth to the resistance to DJs showing up with computers.

(Of course, that said, it’s a shame the new MPCs don’t support Ableton Link – at least not that I can see.)

Pioneer have their own market niche because their Toraiz sampler has sync capabilities with the CDJ. But since DJ/producers often differentiate between live acts and DJ sets, I expect a lot will choose to do a live set with an MPC and just use CDJs when DJing. That’s already the case with the Elektron machines you see so often in live sets.

Elektron probably have the least concern. Their user base is pretty loyal, and the Analog line sounds absolutely terrific. But even some would-be Elektron customers may decide a sample-based workflow and more DAW-style flexibility is desirable – without all the menu diving.

Even Ableton ought to have a look at this and wonder if the Push is going to stay as desirable as a performance solution.

Roland also missed a chance to get an entry here, though I suspect they would need added software capabilities.

Don’t get me wrong – there are still advantages to computer software. When it comes to more complex arrangements, I’m all about a big screen. And past leaks suggest the new Akai hardware won’t support plug-ins. So these machines for many producers will be about live performance. Then again, there’s nothing stopping you from using the MPCs with a computer for those contexts. The category this will clearly damage is the computer-plus-machine area — meaning things like Push and Maschine look less desirable.

I’ll definitely be keen to test this. It’s still down to software – despite the embedded context, that’s what you’re testing. And I’m curious to see how you would integrate this with studio workflows on the computer.

But long before NAMM, it seems we have the big NAMM story for producers.

Just remember – drum machines have no soul. ?

The post Akai’s standalone MPCs just leaked – and they could replace your laptop appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The Artists Making Leipzig Germany’s Edgiest Techno Scene

Delivered... By Leibniz | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 1:10 pm

The post The Artists Making Leipzig Germany’s Edgiest Techno Scene appeared first on Electronic Beats.

DJ Zaeden collaborates with Maroon 5 for ‘Don’t Wanna Know’ remix – RadioandMusic.com

Delivered... "Indian Electronic Music" - Google News | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 12:30 pm

RadioandMusic.com

DJ Zaeden collaborates with Maroon 5 for 'Don't Wanna Know' remix
RadioandMusic.com
Popular in the dance music circuits, Zaeden began DJing at 14 years and is one of the first Indian electronic music producers to play at Tomorrowland, Belgium and Marenostrum Festival, Spain. Having played at Privilege Ibiza, Pacha, Barcelona, Sunburn, ...

and more »

DJ Zaeden collaborates with Maroon 5 for ‘Don’t Wanna Know’ remix – RadioandMusic.com

Delivered... | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 9:00 am
DJ Zaeden collaborates with Maroon 5 for 'Don't Wanna Know' remix  RadioandMusic.com

MUMBAI: Delhi based 21-year old music producer/DJ Zaeden aka Sahil Sharma has a surprise in store for his fans. Zaeden, who is best known for his tracks ...

DJ Zaeden collaborates with Maroon 5 for ‘Don’t Wanna Know’ remix – RadioandMusic.com

Delivered... | Scene | Mon 9 Jan 2017 9:00 am
DJ Zaeden collaborates with Maroon 5 for 'Don't Wanna Know' remix  RadioandMusic.com

MUMBAI: Delhi based 21-year old music producer/DJ Zaeden aka Sahil Sharma has a surprise in store for his fans. Zaeden, who is best known for his tracks ...

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