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Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » indie


How Depeche Mode (almost) became my own personal Jesus

Delivered... Dorian Lynskey | Scene | Wed 10 Mar 2021 2:00 pm

I thought I was a true fan of the synth-rock giants, but a convention showed me that I preferred music as a solo experience

The first time I really thought about fandom was the evening of 8 July 1990. The occasion was a convention of Depeche Mode fans at Camden Palace in London. I had only been one of them myself for 10 months, since hearing Personal Jesus on Radio 1’s Singled Out made my jaw drop, but I had been making up for lost time. I wasn’t just busy buying up every album, 7-inch and 12-inch that I could lay my hands on, I was also transcribing Martin Gore’s lyrics into an exercise book, painting sleeve art and learning to play the simpler tracks on a Casio keyboard. I don’t recall writing poems about them but let’s not rule it out. I wanted to be a True Fan and do what I thought True fans did, which was to join a fanclub and attend a gathering of the faithful.

Around that time, I filled out a personality test that concluded I was equal parts introvert and extrovert, so Depeche Mode were my ideal band. They sang about many of my pressing concerns – sex, death, guilt, spiritual confusion, gauche leftwing politics – and I could dance to them. I liked their story, too. After songwriter Vince Clarke quit in 1981, Gore had to reinvent the band on the hoof, trying out communist chic and industrial angst before finding that horny, morbid sweet spot on the Black Celebration album. At the same time, advances in synthesiser and sampler technology enabled their music to grow grander and sleeker. By the time I got into them, they were electronic music’s first arena band but still hadn’t lost their essential Basildon blokeyness. You could never be David Bowie but you could, with a bit of luck, imagine being genial synth-prodder Andy “Fletch” Fletcher.

Related: From the Band to Beyoncé: concert films to fill the live music black hole

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Tenement Kid: Primal Scream’s Bobby Gillespie to publish memoir

Delivered... Laura Snapes | Scene | Wed 10 Mar 2021 11:30 am

Book charts the singer’s journey from his childhood in Glasgow to his band’s breakthrough 1991 album Screamadelica and their notorious live shows

Bobby Gillespie is to publish a memoir spanning his childhood in a working-class Glaswegian family and the breakthrough of his band Primal Scream with their third album, 1991’s Screamadelica.

Tenement Kid took shape during the first year of the pandemic, Gillespie said in a statement. “At the beginning of 2020 I wanted to challenge myself creatively and do something I had never done before. I didn’t want to write another rock record, I’d done plenty of those, so, I decided to write a memoir of my early life and worked on it all through the summer, autumn and winter of 2020.”

Related: Bobby Gillespie remembers Andrew Weatherall: ‘He was a true bohemian’

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Fresh picks for Bandcamp Friday – essentials of experimentalism and groove

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Fri 5 Feb 2021 10:12 pm

Forget what platform it's on for a moment - a Friday is a perfect time to support independent DIY music production, by directly supporting the artist and downloading something that you can come back to again and again.

The post Fresh picks for Bandcamp Friday – essentials of experimentalism and groove appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Irish drill, jazz violin and supermarket musicals: 30 new artists for 2021

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Fri 1 Jan 2021 7:00 am

From the ferocious hardcore punk of Nicolas Cage Fighter to the ultra-meditative ambient of KMRU, discover new music from right across the pop spectrum

Which new artists are you excited for in 2021? Leave your recommendations in the comments below.

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Irish drill, jazz violin and supermarket musicals: 30 new artists for 2021

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Fri 1 Jan 2021 7:00 am

From the ferocious hardcore punk of Nicolas Cage Fighter to the ultra-meditative ambient of KMRU, discover new music from right across the pop spectrum

Which new artists are you excited for in 2021? Leave your recommendations in the comments below.

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‘All that mattered was survival’: the songs that got us through 2020

Delivered... Guardian music | Scene | Thu 31 Dec 2020 11:00 am

Butterflies with Mariah, Bronski Beat in the Peak District, Snoop Dogg on a food delivery ad … our writers reveal the tracks that made 2020 bearable

When it came to lockdown comfort listening, there was something particularly appealing about lush symphonic soul made by artists such as Teddy Pendergrass and the Delfonics. But there was one record I reached for repeatedly: Black Moses by Isaac Hayes, and particularly the tracks arranged by Dale Warren. Their version of Burt Bacharach’s (They Long to Be) Close to You is an epic, spinning the original classic into a nine-minute dose of saccharine soul. But their cover of Going in Circles, another Warren exercise in expansion, is their masterpiece, reimagining the Friends of Distinction original as a seven-minute arrangement with stirring strings and beatific backing vocals that builds into a story about lost love that transcends the genre’s usual parameters. A perfect, if slightly meta, balm for the repetitive lockdown blues. Lanre Bakare

Related: AG Cook: the nutty producer behind the decade's most divisive music

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‘All that mattered was survival’: the songs that got us through 2020

Delivered... Guardian music | Scene | Thu 31 Dec 2020 11:00 am

Butterflies with Mariah, Bronski Beat in the Peak District, Snoop Dogg on a food delivery ad … our writers reveal the tracks that made 2020 bearable

When it came to lockdown comfort listening, there was something particularly appealing about lush symphonic soul made by artists such as Teddy Pendergrass and the Delfonics. But there was one record I reached for repeatedly: Black Moses by Isaac Hayes, and particularly the tracks arranged by Dale Warren. Their version of Burt Bacharach’s (They Long to Be) Close to You is an epic, spinning the original classic into a nine-minute dose of saccharine soul. But their cover of Going in Circles, another Warren exercise in expansion, is their masterpiece, reimagining the Friends of Distinction original as a seven-minute arrangement with stirring strings and beatific backing vocals that builds into a story about lost love that transcends the genre’s usual parameters. A perfect, if slightly meta, balm for the repetitive lockdown blues. Lanre Bakare

Related: AG Cook: the nutty producer behind the decade's most divisive music

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Essential games for music nerds from the Steam Winter Sale

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 28 Dec 2020 10:08 pm

2020 saw the gaming industry supplant film as the predominant AV medium. There are plenty of great possibilities for immersion now on sale for Mac and PC - and titles music makers and nerds won't want to miss. Here are some favorites, including some that might fly under the radar.

The post Essential games for music nerds from the Steam Winter Sale appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Aunt music: how the lost sounds of Great Aunt Mirry were unlocked

Delivered... Laura Barton | Scene | Thu 24 Dec 2020 1:00 pm

Musician Tom Fraser has reclaimed a late relative’s musical legacy, thanks to the chance find of a scratchy record on a doorstep

The musician Tom Fraser’s memories of his Great Aunt Mirry are few. “I remember her once on the sofa, just sort of being quite a jolly little old lady,” he says. “And I went to her funeral, I remember that.”

It was a long time after her death that he came to learn of another side of Mirry’s life. A box of belongings, left on the street outside his grandmother’s house in Notting Hill, held a record that suggested she was more than just a jolly little old lady.

It just felt right, playing on this woman's music who I'd never met, from over 60 years ago

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Guardian albums and tracks of 2020: how our writers voted

Delivered... Guardian music | Scene | Fri 18 Dec 2020 7:00 am

We’ve announced our favourite releases of the year – now the Guardian’s music critics reveal their individual top picks of 2020

Here’s how our writers voted: favourite choice first.

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The 50 best albums of 2020: 50-31

Delivered... Ben Beaumont-Thomas and Laura Snapes | Scene | Wed 2 Dec 2020 7:06 am

The sounds in our countdown turn to horny pop, neo-soul fantasy, a trap masterclass and some robotic dance moves

This list is drawn from votes by Guardian music critics – each critic votes for their top 20 albums, with points allocated for each placing, and those points tallied to create this order. Check in every weekday to see our next picks, and please share your own favourite albums of 2020 in the comments below.

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Cabaret Voltaire: Shadow of Fear review – a fittingly dystopian fantasy from Sheffield’s industrial pioneers

Delivered... Alexis Petridis | Scene | Thu 19 Nov 2020 4:00 pm

(Mute)
The first Cabaret Voltaire album in more than two decades feels oddly of the moment, their grim presentiments about disinformation, curfews and crackdowns fulfilled

Between 1974 and 1994, Cabaret Voltaire made a career out of being slightly ahead of the curve. They may well have been the world’s first industrial band. Throbbing Gristle coined the genre’s name, but more than a year before they formed, Cabaret Voltaire were ensconced in a Sheffield attic, experimenting with tape cut-ups inspired by William Burroughs, looped recordings of machinery in place of rhythms and churning electronic noise. When their sound shifted in the early 80s to something more commercially palatable, involving funk, the influence of New York electro and, eventually, collaborations with Chicago house pioneer Marshall Jefferson, it presaged their home town’s unique take on dance music, which eventually produced revered techno label Warp.

Related: Sign up for the Sleeve Notes email: music news, bold reviews and unexpected extras

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Jónsi: Shiver review – ethereal steel for strange times

Delivered... Jude Rogers | Scene | Sun 4 Oct 2020 1:00 pm

(Krunk)
Co-producer AG Cook strips back Jónsi’s first album in a decade to a clever mix of crunchy electronica and floating vocals

Twenty-six years into an experimental career where he’s still generally thought of as the indie boy Enya, Jónsi Birgisson has recruited a 30-year-old co-producer to help change his game. Step forward AG Cook: Charlie XCX’s creative director and a master of glitchy, peculiarly skewed modern pop. On Jónsi’s first solo album for 10 years, Cook encouraged him to strip each song to its bare bones and add stranger, steelier muscles.

The results veer between the kind of palatably edgy, ethereal fare for which Chris Martin would give his eye teeth, and crunchy electronica ripe for club remixes. Jónsi’s voice takes on different incarnations, at times being heavily processed, at others floating free. Good gentle moments come early, like Cannibal, on which the Cocteau Twins’ Liz Fraser guests delicately, and Sumarið Sem Aldrei Kom [The Summer That Never Came], which carries in its slowness a soft, fluid sadness.

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Why Radiohead are the Blackest white band of our times

Delivered... Daphne A Brooks | Scene | Fri 2 Oct 2020 10:00 am

Radiohead released Kid A 20 years ago today. It pointed a new direction for rock music – and mirrored radical Black art by imagining new spaces to live in amid a hostile world

Ask anyone who is the Blackest white rock band to emerge over the past 30 years, and my hunch is that few would say Radiohead.

The hypnotically wonky Oxfordshire quintet are lauded for intricate, challenging music that is now far from their grunge-era breakthrough. Their rapturous second album (1995’s The Bends) yoked together symphonic alt-rock melodies with even bigger feelings, and their post-prog-rock masterpiece OK Computer (1997) delivered darkly ominous late 20th-century dread about everything from rising neoliberal alienation to the coldness of technology. It prompted stop you in your tracks superlatives from critics, who became even more rapturous for the follow-up, Kid A, released 20 years ago today.

What makes Radiohead so radical are their deeply introspective other worlds, built as bulwarks against the tyrannies of everyday life

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Working Men’s Club review

Delivered... Dave Simpson | Scene | Fri 2 Oct 2020 9:00 am

(Heavenly)
The West Yorkshire band take the stark electronics of the post-punk scene and warm them with Detroit techno and Italian house – while addressing Andrew Neil with mischievous one-liners

The Golden Lion pub in Todmorden gives locals the chance to meet and talk about the high number of UFO sightings in the isolated West Yorkshire town. It’s also the centre of a thriving music scene, where 18-year-old Sydney Minsky-Sargeant’s band have undergone lineup changes to evolve from a guitar band into a New Order-type rock-electronic hybrid.

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