Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): Access denied for user ''@'localhost' (using password: NO) in /home/customer/www/e-music.india-meets-classic.net/public_html/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872

Warning: mysql_get_server_info(): A link to the server could not be established in /home/customer/www/e-music.india-meets-classic.net/public_html/wp-content/plugins/gigs-calendar/gigs-calendar.php on line 872
Indian E-music – The right mix of Indian Vibes… » Music


Delia Derbyshire: The Myths and the Legendary Tapes review – playful paean to a musical pioneer

Delivered... Rebecca Nicholson | Scene | Sun 16 May 2021 10:30 pm

Experimental and inventive, Caroline Catz’s film paints a fond, intimate and arty portrait of the influential electronic musician

I hope films like Delia Derbyshire: The Myths and the Legendary Tapes (BBC Four) will still have a home at the BBC after BBC Four becomes an archive-only channel, as is planned. I cannot imagine anything so wilfully arty sitting on a more mainstream channel. This is a wonderfully inventive piece of storytelling that celebrates the strange brilliance of a mysterious pioneer of electronic music. Even if it is not likely to bring in record audiences, it would be a crying shame if it were not on television.

Knowing only a little about Derbyshire’s life before, and feeling much more illuminated afterwards, I think it makes sense that her story is told in this experimental style. It was originally a short film, written and directed by Caroline Catz, who has extended it to feature length. The result feels like several ideas spliced together, surprisingly effectively.

Related: Delia Derbyshire and the BBC's Radiophonic Workshop: From the archive, 3 September 1970

Continue reading...

Fatima Al Qadiri: Medieval Femme review – ancient and otherworldly

Delivered... Kitty Empire | Scene | Sun 16 May 2021 9:00 am

(Hyperdub)
This LA-based Kuwaiti artist combines early music with digital dubs to dreamlike effect

A decade into a career at the confluence of digital music and art, the latest album by LA-based Kuwaiti electronic composer Fatima Al Qadiri is full of echoes. Her 2017 EP, Shaneera, was a party-facing tribute to the “evil queens” in Arab culture, thriving in spite of oppression. More recently, her immersive score for Mati Diop’s contemporary ghost story, Atlantics, helped earn the film the Grand Prix at Cannes in 2019.

Medieval Femme, by contrast, hymns some very different Arab women to Shaneera – those of the medieval period – with the otherworldly delicacy honed on Al Qadiri’s soundtrack work. She has often played with perspective (how the west views the east) as well as place (often hyper-real) and time (juxtapositions, anachronisms), but never quite like this. Sheba sounds like early music laced with sighs of sensual longing and the merest scissor snip of 21st-century percussion. The meditative Tasakuba features sorrowful couplets from the seventh-century elegiac poet Al-Khansa. Apart from the more contemporary dystopian digitals of Golden, the feel throughout is ancient and enigmatic. But these lute tones and classical Arabic music figures are rendered digitally; the cloister garden is an interior dream-space.

Continue reading...

Canilla’s love ballads sing from code and dismantled accordions; LP first listen here

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Thu 13 May 2021 6:54 pm

The ruins of fractured accordions are reanimated with hybrid mechanical-digital constructions, to sing the imagined love ballads of a wounded forest. Canilla's latest creation deserves a full listen - so let's premiere it here together, right now.

The post Canilla’s love ballads sing from code and dismantled accordions; LP first listen here appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Everything but the gull: how Ben Watt fought the Covid blues with birdsong

Delivered... Sam Wollaston | Scene | Mon 10 May 2021 11:15 am

Blackcap! Chiffchaff! Warbler! The Everything But the Girl star is fighting to save a nature reserve in the heart of the city. As his new album Storm Shelter is released, we join him for some birdwatching

Cetti’s warbler!” says Ben Watt suddenly, raising a finger to indicate the new addition to the ambient soundscape. Listen, he says, to the opening “chi” followed by what sounds “almost like a little typewriter going off”. Watt does that, interrupts himself, or the silence if he’s not talking, to announce a new bird he’s seen or heard. “Blackcap!” he’ll exclaim. “Chiffchaff!”

We’re sitting in a bird hide overlooking a reed bed and an expanse of water on a gorgeous spring day. A heron stands, still as a photo, two metres in front of us. It could be rural East Anglia – apart from the roar of traffic and the giant arched structure in the background. These are, respectively, the A406 north circular and Wembley Stadium. And the place we’re at is the Welsh Harp reservoir, named after a pub that no longer exists.

The damage we're doing will contribute to the end of us

Related: Olivia Rodrigo: ‘I’m a teenage girl. I feel heartbreak and longing really intensely’

Continue reading...

One to watch: BABii

Delivered... Damien Morris | Scene | Sat 8 May 2021 2:00 pm

The Margate-based multi-hyphenate channels her colourful upbringing on her hypnotic second album

For her forthcoming album, MiiRROR, BABii has produced 10 darkly beautiful electronic pop songs, directed videos, made costumes, designed an alternative reality game, written a fantasy book, birthed a dragon and typed a lot of extra “i”s. Born Daisy Warne, brought up by her father in Canada and England, she still helps run his arts studio in Margate as well as teaching video game writing at uni. Days off are rare.

Growing up surrounded by her dad’s artist friends in creative spaces and salvage yards, BABii learned how to create beauty out of anything, all the time. Recently, she reconnected with her mother, and the emotional aftershock led her to empty her heart into the fabulous MiiRROR. It anatomises BABii’s chaotic childhood and ongoing struggle with maternal figures, while sounding like a chainsaw made of candyfloss.

Continue reading...

Futuristic AV, EPs from Mexico’s Interspecifics, CNDSD, Ivan

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Events,Scene | Fri 7 May 2021 5:55 pm

It's a dark and uncertain time across Latin America, so sending some serious love to everyone. All the more reason to take in the futuristic voices in today's hybrid MUTEK session, from our friends Interspecifics and CNDSD + Iván Abreu.

The post Futuristic AV, EPs from Mexico’s Interspecifics, CNDSD, Ivan appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Sophia Kennedy: Monsters review – showtunes and sub-bass from sonic shapeshifter

Delivered... Rachel Aroesti | Scene | Fri 7 May 2021 8:30 am

(City Slang)
Unable to categorise the Baltimore-born, Hamburg-bred artist, you are thrown into her disarming, disorientating but oddly relaxing emotional world

For the modern musician, genre-fickleness is no longer the exception but the rule. Switching styles and blending sounds doesn’t simply cater to listeners with depleted attention spans – it can also be a way of evoking and critiquing the chaotic internet culture that left them that way. Baltimore-born, Hamburg-bred artist Sophia Kennedy’s music does both those things, but it also channels a restlessness and nostalgia that has little in common with her peers.

For a start, her sonic references include Tin Pan Alley and vintage showtunes, she complements curious melodic callbacks with ominous electronica, expansive hip-hop, sub-bass, trap beats, twanging guitars and the sound of monkeys screeching. What’s also unusual is that she doesn’t temper this fluctuation with a consistent voice: frequently, it’s a low, stately, Bette Davis-style drawl; sometimes it’s a brittle falsetto; sometimes a taut, mean sprechgesang.

Continue reading...

Sophia Kennedy: Monsters review – showtunes and sub-bass from sonic shapeshifter

Delivered... Rachel Aroesti | Scene | Fri 7 May 2021 8:30 am

(City Slang)
Unable to categorise the Baltimore-born, Hamburg-bred artist, you are thrown into her disarming, disorientating but oddly relaxing emotional world

For the modern musician, genre-fickleness is no longer the exception but the rule. Switching styles and blending sounds doesn’t simply cater to listeners with depleted attention spans – it can also be a way of evoking and critiquing the chaotic internet culture that left them that way. Baltimore-born, Hamburg-bred artist Sophia Kennedy’s music does both those things, but it also channels a restlessness and nostalgia that has little in common with her peers.

For a start, her sonic references include Tin Pan Alley and vintage showtunes, she complements curious melodic callbacks with ominous electronica, expansive hip-hop, sub-bass, trap beats, twanging guitars and the sound of monkeys screeching. What’s also unusual is that she doesn’t temper this fluctuation with a consistent voice: frequently, it’s a low, stately, Bette Davis-style drawl; sometimes it’s a brittle falsetto; sometimes a taut, mean sprechgesang.

Continue reading...

RIP Joel Chadabe, a leader of electronic music, interactive musicianship, and teaching

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Thu 6 May 2021 8:31 pm

Joel Chadabe was a composer who helped launch the notion of interactive music systems and electronic music education as it has now come to spread around the world. He passed at the start of this week, even as he continued educational work through this year.

The post RIP Joel Chadabe, a leader of electronic music, interactive musicianship, and teaching appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

‘I’m going to follow my mind’: Falle Nioke, the Guinean musician who moved to Margate

Delivered... Max Pilley | Scene | Wed 5 May 2021 9:18 am

The singer spent hard years touring west Africa to pursue his dream of a music career, but a chance holiday meeting – and relocation to the Kent coast – sealed the deal

Ten years ago, Falle Nioke was sitting with only his bolon drum for company in a Gambian jail cell, some 3,000 miles from the Kent seaside town of Margate where he now lives and light years from his current world of domestic bliss and critical acclaim.

Raised in Conakry, Guinea, the 33-year-old singer and percussionist spent most of his 20s as part of a touring group of musicians that played across west Africa, a pursuit often hamstrung by arrests pertaining to immigration permits. Nioke survived by whatever means necessary to hold on to his musical passion. “I used to make soap and go to the market to sell it to pay the rent,” he says today. “If someone was selling rice, we would sing for them and we would get some fees and some food.” His indelibly positive worldview was forged during these years. “Everywhere I have been, there are people who will be happy to help,” he says.

Continue reading...

India’s electronic music producers send S O S in compilation

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Mon 3 May 2021 5:26 pm

To everyone impacted by COVID-19 in India, families and friends, and those who have lost around the world - I hope we all take a moment to pause and think of you.

The post India’s electronic music producers send S O S in compilation appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Explore game worlds of paper, 16-bit DOS, and soaring music to match, from SunVox creator

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Scene | Mon 3 May 2021 4:43 pm

No money for a high-end game console? Make it out of paper, code it in 16-bit DOS, and give it an epic soundtrack on cheap machines, like SunVox creator Alexander Zolotov.

The post Explore game worlds of paper, 16-bit DOS, and soaring music to match, from SunVox creator appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Leon Vynehall: Rare, Forever review – warped, intense, cerebral

Delivered... Damien Morris | Scene | Sun 2 May 2021 3:00 pm

(Ninja Tune)
The DJ-producer’s introspective, genre-defying second album rewards engaged listening

Leon Vynehall’s 2018 album Nothing Is Still was a sleepy sensation. Although the house DJ had produced a couple of track compilations and entrancing singles, such as Midnight on Rainbow Road and It’s Just (House of Dupree), he took a giant step forward with his debut album, pulling jazz, ambient, club and chamber music into its sweeping ambit. Each song matched a chapter in an accompanying novella based on Vynehall’s family history; short films were shot. Played live, it evolved into something more warped, intense and cerebral, and some of that energy survives here.

Perhaps that’s because Rare, Forever looks inward. Although it’s as carefully constructed as Nothing Is Still, there is nothing as mellifluous as that record’s Movements (Chapter III). It’s more abstract, fractured, complex and unpredictable, fluttering across the lanes. This is best exemplified by Snakeskin ∞ Has-Been’s skittish rave, with its vertiginous drop and wasp-in-a-jar stabs, disintegrating without warning into the pastoral nocturne of its coda. Rare, Forever rewards engaged listening, though, and intriguingly it’s the classical and jazz influences that are most persuasive, particularly on album bookends Ecce! Ego! and All I See Is You, Velvet Brown, and Mothra’s majestic orchestral techno crescendo.

Continue reading...

Music for orangutans, as Lyra Pramuk and Rani Jambak connect to Sumatra’s ecosystem

Delivered... Peter Kirn | Artists,Scene | Fri 30 Apr 2021 7:47 pm

The music flows easily, entangled like vines, in a production constructed between Berlin and Indonesia over Zoom. But in these serene melodies, there is a plea for the ecosystem of North Sumatra.

The post Music for orangutans, as Lyra Pramuk and Rani Jambak connect to Sumatra’s ecosystem appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Sisters With Transistors review – a gloriously geeky music doc

Delivered... Wendy Ide | Scene | Sun 25 Apr 2021 11:00 am

Laurie Anderson narrates this fascinating film about the female pioneers of electronic music

What a joy is a documentary that neither talks down to its audience nor diminishes its subject. Lisa Rovner’s Sisters With Transistors is an unapologetically geeky look at the female pioneers of early electronic music which veers fearlessly into the experimental end of the knob-twiddling spectrum. Laurie Anderson narrates a fascinating film that takes in, among others, theremin virtuoso Clara Rockmore; a beatifically smiling Suzanne Ciani sensually stroking a suitcase full of wires; Éliane Radigue, engrossed in her minimal tonal experiments; and the great Delia Derbyshire, with the mathematical precision of her diction and her demure slingback tapping to a throbbing loop of noise.

Related: Sisters With Transistors: inside the fascinating film about electronic music’s forgotten pioneers

For viewing details, go to Modern Films

Continue reading...
Next Page »
TunePlus Wordpress Theme